Progressive muscle relaxation. Because relaxing your physical body can be just as effective as relaxing your mind. Try repeatedly tensing and releasing your toes to the count of 10, recommend experts at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Sleep Disorders Center. It’s crazy simple, but it can actually help relieve pent up energy and help you feel more relaxed.
If you’re bringing the stress of your job and daily life to bed with you, you’re not going to sleep well. Resolve to keep everything that’s stressful out of your bedroom, so don’t bring in work materials, your phone or even allow yourself to think about work while in your bedroom. You can also gain control over your worries and anxieties by keeping a worry journal. Write about the things that are bothering you so you can work through them instead of bringing them to bed with you.
They’re placed under a category called sedative hypnotics and include benzodiazepines and barbiturates. You’ve probably heard of the benzodiazepines, or psychotropic drugs, called Xanax, Valium, Ativan and Librium, which are also known as common anti-anxiety medications. Because they can induce drowsiness, they can help people sleep, but these drugs can be addictive too — and that’s not a good thing.
Use sleeping aids and devices: Experiment with white noise machines, adjustable beds, sleep masks, and indoor air purifiers if you need help sleeping. White noise machines or noise reducers create ambient or white noise, which makes it more difficult for a sleeper to hear any potentially disruptive noises. Adjustable beds can alleviate pain that can disturb sleep, especially for those suffering from hip and knee pain or acid reflux disease. A sleep mask tricks the brain into falling asleep more quickly for people who need to sleep or nap during daylight, and indoor air purifiers lessen symptoms suffered by those with allergies or nasal congestion.
Judgments (“I should be asleep”), comparisons (“my BF/GF/roommate is sleeping; why can’t I?”), and catastrophic thinking (“If I don’t get eight hours’ sleep tonight, I’ll mess up that presentation tomorrow, lose my job, and die tired and alone”) don’t do us any good. Make the night easier by accepting it for what it is, letting go of judgments, and being gentle with yourself. The silver lining? You just might get to see a glorious sunrise.

Not only does lavender smell lovely, but the aroma of this flowering herb may also relax your nerves, lower your blood pressure, and put you in a relaxed state. A 2005 study at Wesleyan University found that subjects who sniffed lavender oil for two minutes at three, 10-minute intervals before bedtime increased their amount of deep sleep and felt more vigorous in the morning.


Sleep needs and patterns of sleep and wakefulness are not the same for everyone. The first step in determining your need for sleep is through self-evaluation. Ask yourself: "How tired do I feel during the daytime? When do I feel most alert? When does fatigue set in?" Even moments of sleepiness that you may think of as routine, for instance, falling asleep on the subway on the way to work, or during a lecture, are likely a sign that you are not getting enough sleep.
Keep precautions in mind. Diphenhydramine and doxylamine aren't recommended for people who have closed-angle glaucoma, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnea, severe liver disease, digestive system obstruction or urinary retention. In addition, sleep aids pose risks for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, and might pose risks to people over age 75, including an increased risk of strokes and dementia.
Finally, you may find yourself turning to over-the-counter medications to help your sleep. One of the most common is a naturally occurring hormone called melatonin. It is sold in many pharmacies and herbal supplement stores. It can be highly effective if you have insomnia related to a poorly timed circadian rhythm. As it has a low risk of major side effects (the most frequent is sleepiness), it might be an option to consider. Other herbal supplements (such as valerian root) do not have a lot of research supporting their efficacy.

Turns out, you’re never too old for a bubble bath, especially when it comes to natural sleep aids. A study published in the journal Sleep found that women with insomnia who took a hot bath for about 90 to 120 minutes slept much better that night than those who didn’t. Temps for ideal bath water range from 98 to 100 degrees F, but the Goldilocks temperature hovers at around 112 degrees, according to the Wall Street Journal.
In fact, better sleep may be a byproduct of increased mindfulness, even if it’s not directly addressed in practice. In a 2015 study in JAMA Internal Medicine, adults who spent two hours a week learning meditation and mindfulness techniques for six weeks (but who never discussed sleep) reported less insomnia and fatigue than those who’d spent that time learning basic sleep hygiene.
According to one study, exposure to electrical lights between dusk and bedtime might negatively affect our chances at quality sleep. Assuming you don’t want to sit in the dark for hours, find the happy medium by dimming the lights as bedtime draws near. Also consider changing all light bulbs to “soft/warm” varieties with a color temperature less than 3,000 kelvins, all of which can reduce lights’ effects on our nervous systems.
When you’re desperate to get some rest, it’s tempting to head for the medicine cabinet for relief. And you may get it in the moment. But if you regularly have trouble sleeping, that’s a red flag that something’s wrong. It could be something as simple as too much caffeine or viewing electronic screens late at night. Or it may be a symptom of an underlying medical or psychological problem. But whatever it is, it won’t be cured with sleeping pills. At best, sleeping pills are a temporary band aid. At worst, they’re an addictive crutch that can make insomnia worse in the long run.
Are you ready to start sleeping better? Read on to find out why sleep matters, how much sleep you really need, and science-backed sleep hacks to improve your sleep. As Bulletproof Founder Dave Asprey writes in his new book “Game Changers: What Leaders, Innovators, and Mavericks Do to Win at Life”, “sleep quality drives happiness, and as we’ve seen, happiness drives success.”

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.
There’s this new finding where playing sounds at a certain frequency when your brain is in deep sleep actually increases the percentage of time spent in deep sleep. We’re publishing this paper in Society for Neuroscience Conference in a couple of weeks, and it’s basically what my TED talk is about. Playing these pulses at the same frequency as your deep-sleep brainwaves primes more deep sleep. Scientifically speaking, it’s a similar process as transcranial direct-current stimulation, except it doesn’t use electricity—just sound. Sound gets transmitted into electricity because you’re picking up on the auditory cortex while you’re sleeping.
Activated charcoal: Toxins from kryptonite foods like refined flours and factory-farmed meat cause inflammation in your brain, messing with your sleep. Cleaning up your diet is the first step to flushing out toxins (find out more with this Bulletproof Diet Roadmap). An activated charcoal supplement speeds up the process, removing toxins from the gut before they reach your brain. Learn more about the benefits of activated charcoal and dosage guidelines here.
Probably the most common wearable to measuring sleep right now is the Fitbit. I’ve studied these devices in depth in a well-controlled laboratory experiment where we’re monitoring brainwaves. I can say the Fitbit is pretty accurate in measuring when you’re asleep and when you’re wake, but when it comes to measuring sleep stages, basically any device that measures heart rate, like the Apple Watch, is totally inaccurate. That’s because they don’t sample at the frequency necessary to get a good read on your sleep stages.
"If you find yourself unable to fall asleep, get up and go into another room. Stay up as long as you wish and then return to the bedroom to sleep. Although we do not want you to watch the clock, we want you to get out of bed if you do not fall asleep immediately. Remember the goal is to associate your bed with falling asleep quickly! If you are in bed more than about 10 minutes without falling asleep and have not gotten up, you are not following this instruction."
Imagine yourself drifting in a blissful slumber while practicing deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation. Treating insomnia with a self-administered muscle relaxation training program: a follow-up. Gustafson R. Psychological reports, 1992, May.;70(1):0033-2941. Starting at one end of the body and working up or down, clench and then release each section of muscles for instant all-over relaxation.

Challenge yourself to stay awake – your mind will rebel! It’s called the sleep paradox, says psychotherapist Julie Hirst (worklifebalancecentre.org). She explains: “Keep your eyes wide open, repeat to yourself ‘I will not sleep’. The brain doesn’t process negatives well, so interprets this as an instruction to sleep and eye muscles tire quickly as sleep creeps up.”
You have a peak moment of awakeness during the morning. After lunch you usually have a glucose spike, especially if you have a big heavy lunch, like a cheeseburger. That glucose spike combined with a circadian dip gives you a period of fatigue between around 2 and 4pm. You’ll then have another spike in alertness right before dinner, and then you’ll start getting tired again closer to bedtime. That’s your 24-hour circadian rhythm, basically.
The federal government’s Healthy People initiative has established a goal of getting more people to get adequate sleep on a regular basis. Their recommended amount of sleep is 8 hours for people 18 to 21 and 7 hours per night for adults over 21. According to their numbers, 69.6% of the population meets this goal, and the government wants to raise this to 70.9% by 2020.
If you suffer from insomnia, try to stick to a routine at bedtime, and go to bed at the same time every day. Avoid caffeine and nicotine before bedtime, and get plenty of exercise during the day. A dark room free of noise may also help-consider buying a “white noise” device if your bedroom is noisy. If you are having trouble falling asleep, try relaxation techniques like breathing exercises, meditation, or yoga.
Melatonin is the hormone that controls sleep, so it's no wonder that it naturally induces sleep. Although some experts recommend taking higher doses, studies show that lower doses are more effective. Plus, there's concern that too-high doses could cause toxicity as well as raise the risk of depression or infertility. Take 0.3 to 0.5 milligrams before bed.
Eat Magnesium-Rich Foods: The mineral magnesium is a natural sedative. Deficiency of magnesium can result in difficulty sleeping, constipation, muscle tremors or cramps, anxiety, irritability, and pain. Foods rich in magnesium are legumes and seeds, dark leafy green vegetables, wheat bran, almonds, cashews, blackstrap molasses, brewer's yeast, and whole grains. In addition to including these whole foods in your diet, you can also try juicing dark leafy green vegetables.

A study published in Sports Medicine out of France was conducted to help better understand ways to improve the sleep of elite soccer players given their chaotic schedules, late-night games and need for recovery through a good night of sleep. The study found that by consuming carbohydrates — such as honey and whole grain bread — and some forms of protein, especially those that contain serotonin-producing tryptophan like turkey, nuts and seeds, it helped promote restorative sleep. Even tryptophan-filled tart cherry juice, which also contains healing properties like antioxidants, could be a great option. (3)


According to the European Neurology Journal, calcium levels are at their highest during our deep rapid eye movement (REM) sleep periods. What this means is that if you never get to the REM sleep phase or if it’s limited, it could be related to a calcium deficiency. Researchers indicate that the calcium is important because it helps the cells in the brain use the tryptophan to create melatonin — a natural body-producing sleep aid. (4)
Sleep is not just a block of time when you are not awake. Thanks to sleep studies done over the past several decades, it is now known that sleep has distinctive stages that cycle throughout the night. Your brain stays active throughout sleep, but different things happen during each stage. For example, certain stages are needed to help you feel rested and energetic the next day, and other stages help you learn and make memories. A number of vital tasks carried out during sleep help maintain good health and enable people to function at their best. On the other hand, not getting enough sleep can be dangerous for both your mental and physical health.*
Forget the glass of wine—winding down the day with a warm mug of milk and honey is one of the better natural sleep remedies. Milk contains the sleep-inducing amino acid tryptophan, which increases the amount of serotonin, a hormone that works as a natural sedative, in the brain. Carbs, like honey, help transmit that hormone to your brain faster. If you’re hungry for a snack, a turkey sandwich will deliver that power-combo of tryptophan and carbohydrates; or try a banana with milk to get some vitamin B6, which helps convert tryptophan to serotonin. Looking for more delicious insomnia cures? Snack on these 16 foods that can help you sleep better.

21st Century Melatonin 3 mg, 21st Century Melatonin 5 mg, 21st Century Melatonin Quick Dissolve Tablets 10 mg, Advanced Orthomolecular Research Ortho-Sleep, Allergy Research Group Melatonin 20 mg, Allergy Research Group Melatonin 3 mg, Alteril All Natural Sleep Aid, Amazing Formulas Sleeping Formula, Amazing Nutrition Melatonin 10 mg, American Biosciences SLEEPSolve 24/7 Tablets, Bach Original Flower Remedies Rescue Sleep Liquid Melts, Bach Original Flower Remedies Rescue Sleep Spray, Bell Lifestyle Master Herbalist Series Sound Sleep #23, Berry Sleepy, Boiron Quietude Quick Dissolving Tablets, Botanic Choice Homeopathic Sleep Formula, Botanic Choice Melatonin Orange-Flavored Lozenges, Botanic Choice Restal, Buried Treasure Sleep Complete, California Gold Nutrition Targeted Support Sleep 101, California Xtracts G’Night Sleep Formula, Cenegenics Rest Assured Capsules, Christopher’s Original Formulas Slumber, Country Life 5-HTP, Country Life Melatonin 1 mg, Country Life Melatonin 3 mg, CTD Labs Noxitropin PM Sleep Aid Fruit Punch, DaVinci Laboratories Liposomal Melatonin Spray, Doctor’s Best 5-HTP, Doctor’s Best L-Tryptophan 500 mg, Doctor’s Best Melatonin 5 mg, Dragon Herbs Lights Out, Dream Water Zero Calorie Sleep & Relaxation Shot Snoozeberry, Earth’s Bounty Sleep Perfect, Eclectic Institute Valerian Passion Flower, Emerald Laboratories Sleep Health, Emergen-C Emergen-zzzz Nighttime Sleep Aid with Melatonin Mellow Berry, Enzymatic Therapy Fatigued to Fantastic, Enzymatic Therapy Sleep Tonight Drops, Enzymatic Therapy Sleep Tonight Tablets, Flora Sleep Essence, FutureBiotics Relax & Sleep, Gaia Herbs RapidRelief Sound Sleep, Gaia Herbs Sleep & Relax Caffeine-Free Tea Bags, Gaia Herbs SleepThru Liquid Phyto-Caps, Health King Quality Sleep Herb Tea, Herb Pharm Relaxing Sleep, Herbs Etc. Deep Sleep Alcohol-Free Softgels, Hyland’s Calms Forte Sleep Aid, Hyland’s Calms Nerve Tension and Sleeplessness Relief Tablets, InstaSleep Sleep Aid, Irwin Naturals Power to Sleep PM, Irwin Naturals Power to Sleep PM Melatonin-Free, Jarrow Formulas 5-HTP Capsules, Jarrow Formulas L-Tryptophan 500 mg Capsules, Jarrow Formulas Melatonin Sustain, Jarrow Formulas Sleep Optimizer Capsules, Jarrow Formulas Theanine 200, Just Potent Melatonin, Kirkman Labs Restless Sleep Herbal Blend, L.A. Naturals Sleep Complex with Valerian & Melatonin, Liddell Homeopathic Insomnia Oral Spray, Life Enhancement Sleep Tight, Life Extension Enhanced Natural Sleep with Melatonin, Life Extension Melatonin 1 mg Tablets, Life Extension Melatonin 6-Hour Timed Release, Life Extension Natural Sleep Melatonin, Life Flo Health Melatonin Body Cream, Luminite Natural Sleep Support Capsules, Mason Natural L-Tryptophan Sleep Formula, Mason Natural Relax & Sleep Tablets, Maxi Health Mel-O-Drop Liquid, MD Products SleepMD, MegaFood Dream Release, Metabolic Maintenance 5-HTP, Midnite PM Drug-Free Sleep Aid, Midnite Sleep Aid Tablets, MRM Melatonin 3 mg, NatraBio Insomnia Relief, Natrol Advanced Melatonin Calm Sleep, Natrol Advanced Sleep Melatonin 10 mg Time-Released Tablets, Natrol Melatonin 1 mg, Natrol Melatonin 10 mg Fast Dissolve Tablets, Natrol Melatonin 2.5 mg Liquid, Natrol Melatonin TR 3 mg, Natrol Sleep’n Restore, Natural Balance Herbal Slumber Melatonin and Valerian Formula, Natural Care SleepFix, Natural Factors 5-HTP, Natural Factors Melatonin, Natural Factors Sleep Relax with Valerian & Hops, Natural Factors Stress Relax Tranquil Sleep Tablets, Natural Vitality Natural Calm Calmful Sleep Wildberry Flavor, Nature Made Max Strength Melatonin Tablets 5 mg, Nature Made Melatonin + 200 mg L-Theanine Softgels, Nature Made Melatonin Gummies, Nature Made Sleep Softgels, Nature Made VitaMelts Sleep Chocolate Mint, Nature’s Answer Slumber, Nature’s Bounty Dual Spectrum Bi-Layer Melatonin Tablets, Nature’s Bounty Maximum Strength Melatonin 10 mg Capsules, Nature’s Bounty Melatonin 1 mg, Nature’s Bounty Melatonin 3 mg, Nature’s Bounty Sleep Complex Gummies, Nature’s Bounty Super Strength Melatonin 5 mg, Nature’s Bounty Valerian Root 450 mg Plus Calming Blend Capsules, Nature’s Lab L-Theanine 200 mg, Nature’s Plus Sleep Assure, Nature’s Trove L-Theanine 200 mg, Nature’s Truth Valerian Root, Nested Naturals Luna Sleep Aid, NeuroScience Inc. Kavinace Ultra PM, New Chapter Zyflamend Nighttime Vegetarian Capsules, New Nordic Melissa Dream Sleep Formula, NoctuRest, NOW Foods 5-HTP, NOW Foods L-Theanine, NOW Foods L-Tryptophan, NOW Foods Melatonin 10 mg, NOW Foods Sleep, NOW Foods Valerian Root, NutraLife Melatonin 5 mg Tablets, Nutricology Melatonin 20 mg, Nutricology Slow Motion Melatonin, Nutriden Advanced Sleep Aid Supplement, Nutrition53 Sleep1, NutritionWorks Sleep Soundly Melatonin 10 mg, Olly Restful Sleep Vitamin, Oregon’s Wild Harvest Sleep Better, ProSupps Crash PM Shredder, Pure Encapsulations 5-HTP, Pure Encapsulations L-Theanine, Pure Encapsulations L-Tryptophan, Pure Encapsulations Melatonin 3 mg, Pure Encapsulations Seditol, Pure Vegan SleepAway, Puritan’s Pride Quick-Dissolving L-Theanine 200 mg, Puritan’s Pride Super Snooze with Melatonin, Puritan’s Pride Super Strength Rapid Release Melatonin, Puritan’s Pride Valerian Root, Quality of Life Pure Balance Serotonin Capsules, Radiance Platinum Melatonin Tablets, Rainbow Light Sleep Z-z-zen, Ridge Crest Herbals DreamOn Natural Sleep Aid, Schiff Knock-Out Melatonin with Theanine and Valerian Tablets, Serenity Natural Sleep Aid and Stress Relief, Siddha Flower Essences Sleep Homeopathic Liquid, Similasan Sleeplessness Relief, Sleep-Max Nature’s Night Time Sleep Aid, Solaray Sleep Blend SP-17, Solgar 5-HTP, Solgar Melatonin 3 mg, Solgar Melatonin 5 mg, Solgar Sweetest Dreams, Somnapure Natural Sleep Aid, Source Naturals Melatonin Serene Night, Source Naturals NightRest with Melatonin Tablets, Source Naturals NutraSleep, Source Naturals Seditol, Source Naturals Vegan True Melatonin, Sundown Naturals 5-HTP, Sundown Naturals Dissolvable Melatonin, Sundown Naturals Melatonin Gummies, Sundown Naturals Valerian Root Capsules, Superior Source Melatonin 5 mg Dissolve Tablets, Traditional Medicinals Organic Nighty Night Caffeine-Free Herbal Tea, Truly Dark Chocolate Melatonin Supplement, Twinlab Melatonin 3 mg Capsules, Vitafusion Beauty Sleep Gummies, Webber Naturals Timed Release Melatonin 5 mg Tablets, Youtheory Sleep, Zenwise Labs Sleep Support

Like all drugs, natural sleep remedies can have side effects and risks. Pre-market evaluation and approval by the FDA are not required for OTC aids, dietary supplements, or herbal products. The particular brand you buy may have inappropriate dosing. You may get less or more of the herb than intended, which could make it dangerous to use in treatments, especially for children or the elderly,
Keep precautions in mind. Diphenhydramine and doxylamine aren't recommended for people who have closed-angle glaucoma, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnea, severe liver disease, digestive system obstruction or urinary retention. In addition, sleep aids pose risks for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, and might pose risks to people over age 75, including an increased risk of strokes and dementia.
Medicate with caution. Whether prescription or over-the-counter, Walia and Olson do not recommend drugs as a first choice for relieving sleeplessness. Ideally, the tips above and improved sleep hygiene should do the trick. But, should you choose a sleep aid, Olson reminds people that, of course, they make you sleepy. This grogginess is great at 11 p.m., but not at 7 a.m. – when you have to drive a car.
A smart tip for jetsetters: Pack melatonin supplements, such as Natrol Melatonin Fast Dissolve Tablets. The supplement helps your body better adjust to the new time zone, allowing you to fall asleep come bedtime and avoid jet lag. But the sleep aid isn’t just for jet lag. You can also pop the tablets when you have occasional sleepiness or when your sleep schedule shifts and you need to get your body into sleep mode. It’s recommended that you start with a small 1 mg dose (take it 20 minutes before bedtime). You can slowly increase your dosage, but don’t exceed 10 mg.
The amount of sleep that a healthy individual needs is largely determined by two factors: genetics and age. Genetics plays a role in both the amount of sleep a person needs, as well as his or her preference for waking up early (these are the so-called "larks," or morning-type individuals) or staying up late (these are the "owls," or evening-type people). Our internal biological clock, which regulates the cycling of many functions including the sleep/wake cycle, can vary slightly from individual to individual. Although our internal clock is set to approximately 24 hours, if your clock runs faster than 24 hours, you tend to be a "lark" and wake up early; if your clock runs more slowly, you tend to be an "owl" and go to bed later.
When figuring out how much sleep you need, it’s important to know your sleep debt as well as your basal sleep need. Many people assume that if they lose an hour of sleep, they just need to get an extra hour of sleep the next night; however, you also have to make up for the extra hour that you were awake and your increased activity during this time. Using your basal sleep need as a foundation, you can determine your sleep debt and adjust it based on how tired you feel or how much extra sleep you think you need.
Even a hint of dim light—8 to 10 lux—has been shown to delay the release of nighttime melatonin in humans. The feeblest of bedside lamps pumps out twice as much: anywhere from 20 to 80 lux. A subtly lit living room, where most people reside in the hours before bed, will hum at around 200 lux. Despite being just 1 to 2 percent of the strength of daylight, this ambient level of incandescent home lighting can have 50 percent of the melatonin-suppressing influence within the brain.
The promise is in the name, and so far I haven’t been disappointed. I’ve tried every app like this one that I could find on the App Store, and this is by far “the best bank for its buck” I’m sure you could find one that has more features, but for a monthly subscription. It does what it promises and wakes me up when I’m already close to waking, and it’s gotten me to work on time every day that I’ve used it. I feel significantly better on mornings when I use Sleep Better than on mornings when I don’t. Great app. The only thing I wish they’d change is more comprehensive sleep statistics and information. I don’t know what some of their charts mean. For instance, how do they calculate my sleep efficiency? To me, 96% sleep efficiency should mean that I wake up feeling peppy and walking on sunshine. While I have woken up feeling much better most nights, there have been one or two mornings when I woke up feeling groggy because I’d only allowed myself five hours of sleep (not the app’s fault) and it still said I had 96-98% sleep efficiency. That doesn’t make sense to me unless they just mean out of the little sleep I happened to get that night. Overall, a great app, and I highly recommend it.
Ease anxiety. Sometimes the sleeplessness stems from worry. Your brain is on overdrive, thinking about your bank account and the big meeting tomorrow and your kid's detention. For people who consistently have trouble "quieting the mind" at night, Olson suggests trying "to train your mind to think about those things at more appropriate times of the day." Schedule a time each day – say, between work and dinner – to simply write a sentence or two about what's worrying you and where you stand with that. "Maybe it's as simple as, 'I thought about this today, but I don't have any real solutions right now,'" Olson says. By systematically documenting these worries during the day, ideally, you'll be less likely to fixate on them at night.

REM sleep occurs after the fourth stage of NREM sleep, with the first stage occurring about 90 minutes after you first fall asleep. The first period of REM lasts around ten minutes, and each stage lengthens until the final stage, which may last as long as an hour. Your brain activity is heightened during REM sleep, and you experience intense dreaming plus periods of muscle paralysis. As you age, you spend less time in REM sleep; adults spend about 20% of their sleep in REM, while infants spend about 50% of sleep in REM.


I haven’t seen a study that empirically shows that it’s helpful. There is certainly a false myth that we need eight hours of continuous sleep: I think it’s possible to have your sleep be a little bit broken up and be perfectly healthy—but getting that eight hours is crucially important. The thing is that the placebo effect in some of these polyphasic sleep methods runs really high.


Goel, N., Kim, H., & Lao, R. P. (2016, October 27). An olfactory stimulus modifies nighttime sleep in young men and women. Chronobiology International, 22(5), 889–904. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Namni_Goel/publication/7469424_An_Olfactory_Stimulus_Modifies_Nighttime_Sleep_in_Young_Men_and_Women/links/5811f6b408ae9b32b0a34d4b.pdf
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