It’s the middle of the night, and you’re staring at the ceiling, thinking about work, or bills, or the kids. Sleep just won’t come, so you reach for a sleeping pill. But did you know that sleep medications are rarely meant for more than short-term use? They can cause dependence and tolerance, and the benefits don’t always outweigh the risks. Learn what you need to know about the side effects and safety concerns of common sleep medications—as well as effective insomnia treatments that don’t come in pill form.
Information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this website for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment. Any third party offering or advertising on this website does not constitute an endorsement by Andrew Weil, M.D. or Healthy Lifestyle Brands.
Are you ready to start sleeping better? Read on to find out why sleep matters, how much sleep you really need, and science-backed sleep hacks to improve your sleep. As Bulletproof Founder Dave Asprey writes in his new book “Game Changers: What Leaders, Innovators, and Mavericks Do to Win at Life”, “sleep quality drives happiness, and as we’ve seen, happiness drives success.”

Valerian. Valerian is a sedating herb that has been used since the second century A.D. to treat insomnia and anxiety. It is believed to work by increasing brain levels of the calming chemical GABA. Although the use of valerian for insomnia hasn’t been extensively studied, the research shows promise and it is generally considered to be safe and non-habit forming. It works best when taken daily for two or more weeks.
1. I go to bed later than I had intended. 2. I go to bed early if I have to get up early in the morning. (R) 3. If it is time to turn off the lights at night I do it immediately. (R) 4. Often I am still doing other things when it is time to go to bed. 5. I easily get distracted by things when I actually would like to go to bed. 6. I do not go to bed on time. 7. I have a regular bedtime which I keep to. (R) 8. I want to go to bed on time but I just don't. 9. I can easily stop with my activities when it is time to go to bed.
21st Century Melatonin 3 mg, 21st Century Melatonin 5 mg, 21st Century Melatonin Quick Dissolve Tablets 10 mg, Advanced Orthomolecular Research Ortho-Sleep, Allergy Research Group Melatonin 20 mg, Allergy Research Group Melatonin 3 mg, Alteril All Natural Sleep Aid, Amazing Formulas Sleeping Formula, Amazing Nutrition Melatonin 10 mg, American Biosciences SLEEPSolve 24/7 Tablets, Bach Original Flower Remedies Rescue Sleep Liquid Melts, Bach Original Flower Remedies Rescue Sleep Spray, Bell Lifestyle Master Herbalist Series Sound Sleep #23, Berry Sleepy, Boiron Quietude Quick Dissolving Tablets, Botanic Choice Homeopathic Sleep Formula, Botanic Choice Melatonin Orange-Flavored Lozenges, Botanic Choice Restal, Buried Treasure Sleep Complete, California Gold Nutrition Targeted Support Sleep 101, California Xtracts G’Night Sleep Formula, Cenegenics Rest Assured Capsules, Christopher’s Original Formulas Slumber, Country Life 5-HTP, Country Life Melatonin 1 mg, Country Life Melatonin 3 mg, CTD Labs Noxitropin PM Sleep Aid Fruit Punch, DaVinci Laboratories Liposomal Melatonin Spray, Doctor’s Best 5-HTP, Doctor’s Best L-Tryptophan 500 mg, Doctor’s Best Melatonin 5 mg, Dragon Herbs Lights Out, Dream Water Zero Calorie Sleep & Relaxation Shot Snoozeberry, Earth’s Bounty Sleep Perfect, Eclectic Institute Valerian Passion Flower, Emerald Laboratories Sleep Health, Emergen-C Emergen-zzzz Nighttime Sleep Aid with Melatonin Mellow Berry, Enzymatic Therapy Fatigued to Fantastic, Enzymatic Therapy Sleep Tonight Drops, Enzymatic Therapy Sleep Tonight Tablets, Flora Sleep Essence, FutureBiotics Relax & Sleep, Gaia Herbs RapidRelief Sound Sleep, Gaia Herbs Sleep & Relax Caffeine-Free Tea Bags, Gaia Herbs SleepThru Liquid Phyto-Caps, Health King Quality Sleep Herb Tea, Herb Pharm Relaxing Sleep, Herbs Etc. Deep Sleep Alcohol-Free Softgels, Hyland’s Calms Forte Sleep Aid, Hyland’s Calms Nerve Tension and Sleeplessness Relief Tablets, InstaSleep Sleep Aid, Irwin Naturals Power to Sleep PM, Irwin Naturals Power to Sleep PM Melatonin-Free, Jarrow Formulas 5-HTP Capsules, Jarrow Formulas L-Tryptophan 500 mg Capsules, Jarrow Formulas Melatonin Sustain, Jarrow Formulas Sleep Optimizer Capsules, Jarrow Formulas Theanine 200, Just Potent Melatonin, Kirkman Labs Restless Sleep Herbal Blend, L.A. Naturals Sleep Complex with Valerian & Melatonin, Liddell Homeopathic Insomnia Oral Spray, Life Enhancement Sleep Tight, Life Extension Enhanced Natural Sleep with Melatonin, Life Extension Melatonin 1 mg Tablets, Life Extension Melatonin 6-Hour Timed Release, Life Extension Natural Sleep Melatonin, Life Flo Health Melatonin Body Cream, Luminite Natural Sleep Support Capsules, Mason Natural L-Tryptophan Sleep Formula, Mason Natural Relax & Sleep Tablets, Maxi Health Mel-O-Drop Liquid, MD Products SleepMD, MegaFood Dream Release, Metabolic Maintenance 5-HTP, Midnite PM Drug-Free Sleep Aid, Midnite Sleep Aid Tablets, MRM Melatonin 3 mg, NatraBio Insomnia Relief, Natrol Advanced Melatonin Calm Sleep, Natrol Advanced Sleep Melatonin 10 mg Time-Released Tablets, Natrol Melatonin 1 mg, Natrol Melatonin 10 mg Fast Dissolve Tablets, Natrol Melatonin 2.5 mg Liquid, Natrol Melatonin TR 3 mg, Natrol Sleep’n Restore, Natural Balance Herbal Slumber Melatonin and Valerian Formula, Natural Care SleepFix, Natural Factors 5-HTP, Natural Factors Melatonin, Natural Factors Sleep Relax with Valerian & Hops, Natural Factors Stress Relax Tranquil Sleep Tablets, Natural Vitality Natural Calm Calmful Sleep Wildberry Flavor, Nature Made Max Strength Melatonin Tablets 5 mg, Nature Made Melatonin + 200 mg L-Theanine Softgels, Nature Made Melatonin Gummies, Nature Made Sleep Softgels, Nature Made VitaMelts Sleep Chocolate Mint, Nature’s Answer Slumber, Nature’s Bounty Dual Spectrum Bi-Layer Melatonin Tablets, Nature’s Bounty Maximum Strength Melatonin 10 mg Capsules, Nature’s Bounty Melatonin 1 mg, Nature’s Bounty Melatonin 3 mg, Nature’s Bounty Sleep Complex Gummies, Nature’s Bounty Super Strength Melatonin 5 mg, Nature’s Bounty Valerian Root 450 mg Plus Calming Blend Capsules, Nature’s Lab L-Theanine 200 mg, Nature’s Plus Sleep Assure, Nature’s Trove L-Theanine 200 mg, Nature’s Truth Valerian Root, Nested Naturals Luna Sleep Aid, NeuroScience Inc. Kavinace Ultra PM, New Chapter Zyflamend Nighttime Vegetarian Capsules, New Nordic Melissa Dream Sleep Formula, NoctuRest, NOW Foods 5-HTP, NOW Foods L-Theanine, NOW Foods L-Tryptophan, NOW Foods Melatonin 10 mg, NOW Foods Sleep, NOW Foods Valerian Root, NutraLife Melatonin 5 mg Tablets, Nutricology Melatonin 20 mg, Nutricology Slow Motion Melatonin, Nutriden Advanced Sleep Aid Supplement, Nutrition53 Sleep1, NutritionWorks Sleep Soundly Melatonin 10 mg, Olly Restful Sleep Vitamin, Oregon’s Wild Harvest Sleep Better, ProSupps Crash PM Shredder, Pure Encapsulations 5-HTP, Pure Encapsulations L-Theanine, Pure Encapsulations L-Tryptophan, Pure Encapsulations Melatonin 3 mg, Pure Encapsulations Seditol, Pure Vegan SleepAway, Puritan’s Pride Quick-Dissolving L-Theanine 200 mg, Puritan’s Pride Super Snooze with Melatonin, Puritan’s Pride Super Strength Rapid Release Melatonin, Puritan’s Pride Valerian Root, Quality of Life Pure Balance Serotonin Capsules, Radiance Platinum Melatonin Tablets, Rainbow Light Sleep Z-z-zen, Ridge Crest Herbals DreamOn Natural Sleep Aid, Schiff Knock-Out Melatonin with Theanine and Valerian Tablets, Serenity Natural Sleep Aid and Stress Relief, Siddha Flower Essences Sleep Homeopathic Liquid, Similasan Sleeplessness Relief, Sleep-Max Nature’s Night Time Sleep Aid, Solaray Sleep Blend SP-17, Solgar 5-HTP, Solgar Melatonin 3 mg, Solgar Melatonin 5 mg, Solgar Sweetest Dreams, Somnapure Natural Sleep Aid, Source Naturals Melatonin Serene Night, Source Naturals NightRest with Melatonin Tablets, Source Naturals NutraSleep, Source Naturals Seditol, Source Naturals Vegan True Melatonin, Sundown Naturals 5-HTP, Sundown Naturals Dissolvable Melatonin, Sundown Naturals Melatonin Gummies, Sundown Naturals Valerian Root Capsules, Superior Source Melatonin 5 mg Dissolve Tablets, Traditional Medicinals Organic Nighty Night Caffeine-Free Herbal Tea, Truly Dark Chocolate Melatonin Supplement, Twinlab Melatonin 3 mg Capsules, Vitafusion Beauty Sleep Gummies, Webber Naturals Timed Release Melatonin 5 mg Tablets, Youtheory Sleep, Zenwise Labs Sleep Support
Keep precautions in mind. Diphenhydramine and doxylamine aren't recommended for people who have closed-angle glaucoma, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnea, severe liver disease, digestive system obstruction or urinary retention. In addition, sleep aids pose risks for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, and might pose risks to people over age 75, including an increased risk of strokes and dementia.
They’re placed under a category called sedative hypnotics and include benzodiazepines and barbiturates. You’ve probably heard of the benzodiazepines, or psychotropic drugs, called Xanax, Valium, Ativan and Librium, which are also known as common anti-anxiety medications. Because they can induce drowsiness, they can help people sleep, but these drugs can be addictive too — and that’s not a good thing.
If you're having trouble falling asleep, listening to calming, soft music as you doze off could be a solution. A report published in August 2015 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews found that listening to music before going to bed may help improve sleep quality. Just make sure you're picking something soothing, and that you set it to turn off after a while, preferably when you're already deep in dreamland.
When we can't sleep, we become more focused on it. Panicked by our lack of shut-eye, we make constant changes to improve the situation - whether that's going to bed earlier, having longer lie-ins, or watching TV in bed. Consequently, we spend less time actually sleeping in the bedroom. The result? The connection between bed and sleep becomes weak, and we effectively un-learn how to sleep.
Chang, A. M., Aeschbach, D., Duffy, J. F., & Czeisler, C. A. (2015, January 27). Evening use of light-emitting eReaders negatively affects sleep, circadian timing, and next-morning alertness. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(4), 1232–1237. Retrieved from http://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/112/4/1232.full.pdf?__hstc=93655746.972fdd7a7debc8575bac5a80cf7e1683.1477353600071.1477353600072.1477353600073.1&__hssc=93655746.1.1477353600074&__hsfp=1773666937
Science shows that meditation significantly lowers stress and reduces anxiety.[4][5] Meditation makes you aware of your automatc thoughts and impulses, and with that awareness comes more control. You learn to differentiate between a helpful thought and a destructive one. Meditation also rewires your brain, strengthening neural pathways that calm your nervous system.[6]

How melatonin helps sleep: Melatonin can shorten the time it takes to fall asleep and increase overall sleep amounts, according to research. It’s been shown to improve quality of sleep and reduce daytime sleepiness and fatigue. Studies also show melatonin may increase REM sleep. It’s during REM sleep that we consolidate and process memory, and prime the regions of the brain associated with learning.
Finally, we checked our remaining contenders for any deal breakers. Was the bottle impossible to open? Were the pills too big or too oddly shaped to swallow? Most of our finalists passed these tests with flying colors, but several natural options fell short on one critical metric — smell. A pill that smells unappetizing is a turn-off, and most of our valerian supplements had an old-sock odor that might discourage us from ever opening the bottle.
These changes in the body's circadian rhythm coincide with a busy time in life. For most teens, the pressure to do well in school is more intense than when they were kids, and it's harder to get by without studying hard. And teens also have other time demands — everything from sports and other extracurricular activities to working a part-time job to save money for college.
Everyone varies, and this is why you need to find out how much your brain needs. And you do that by keeping a sleep diary over a week or two, and just taking an average of how many hours you are actually sleeping. So not lying in bed, but subtracting the time it took you to fall asleep and any time you lay awake in the night. That’s the amount of sleep your brain got that night.
There’s this new finding where playing sounds at a certain frequency when your brain is in deep sleep actually increases the percentage of time spent in deep sleep. We’re publishing this paper in Society for Neuroscience Conference in a couple of weeks, and it’s basically what my TED talk is about. Playing these pulses at the same frequency as your deep-sleep brainwaves primes more deep sleep. Scientifically speaking, it’s a similar process as transcranial direct-current stimulation, except it doesn’t use electricity—just sound. Sound gets transmitted into electricity because you’re picking up on the auditory cortex while you’re sleeping.
Sleeping well directly affects your mental and physical health and the quality of your waking life. Fall short and it can take a serious toll on your daytime energy, productivity, emotional balance, and even your weight. Yet many of us regularly toss and turn at night, struggling to get the sleep we need. There is a solution. Making simple but important changes to your daytime routine and bedtime habits can have a profound impact on how well you sleep, leaving you feeling mentally sharp, emotionally balanced, and full of energy all day long.

If you’re bringing the stress of your job and daily life to bed with you, you’re not going to sleep well. Resolve to keep everything that’s stressful out of your bedroom, so don’t bring in work materials, your phone or even allow yourself to think about work while in your bedroom. You can also gain control over your worries and anxieties by keeping a worry journal. Write about the things that are bothering you so you can work through them instead of bringing them to bed with you.
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) usually focuses on discovering and changing the thoughts or feelings that trigger depression and stress but it can be a natural insomnia cure, too. Research has found that CBT can retrain your body and mind for faster, deeper sleep. In a Harvard University study of 63 insomniacs, CBT was more effective than prescription sleeping pills; it cut the time it took for participants to fall asleep in half and improved sleep quality by 17 percent. You can practice CBT at home, too. The National Sleep Foundation recommends keeping a sleep diary of when you go to bed and wake up, as well as banishing daytime naps. Instead, adopt a regular sleep schedule; that means going to bed and waking up at the same time every day.

Slowed responses and dulled concentration from lack of sleep don't just affect school or sports performance, though. More than half of teens surveyed reported that they have driven a car while drowsy over the past year and 15% said they drove drowsy at least once a week. The National Highway Safety Traffic Administration estimates that more than 100,000 accidents, 40,000 injuries, and 1,500 people are killed in the U.S. every year in crashes caused by drivers who are simply tired. Young people under the age of 25 are far more likely to be involved in drowsy driving crashes.
Fortunately, doing that is easier than you might think. Below, we’ll take a look at the multitude of lifestyle changes—both big and small—that you can make to help you sleep better. We’ll also explore proven herbal remedies that can give you a relaxation boost when you really need it, minus the side effects that tend to come with prescription meds.
7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

If your brain is racing with stressful thoughts, fill it up with up with something a little nicer. "Tell yourself a gentle story — could be a favorite childhood book or movie — and use the same one night after night," says Catherine Darley, ND, of The Institute of Naturopathic Sleep Medicine, Inc. "This is helpful for those people who have an active mind and their thoughts interfere with sleep."


Some of our expectations regarding our sleep might be slightly misguided. As an example, the thought that we will fall asleep almost immediately upon retiring to our beds may be improper. It should normally occur in less than 15 to 20 minutes, but it may take as long as 30 minutes as we get older. In fact, people who fall asleep in less than five minutes may be "pathologically sleepy." This means that they are so sleepy that they fall asleep quicker than might be normal. In some cases, this ability to fall asleep quickly—and enter rapid eye movement (REM) sleep quickly—can be seen in excessive daytime sleepiness that might occur in sleep deprivation or narcolepsy.
If you’re bringing the stress of your job and daily life to bed with you, you’re not going to sleep well. Resolve to keep everything that’s stressful out of your bedroom, so don’t bring in work materials, your phone or even allow yourself to think about work while in your bedroom. You can also gain control over your worries and anxieties by keeping a worry journal. Write about the things that are bothering you so you can work through them instead of bringing them to bed with you.
Depression and anxiety: Depression is more common in persons with disabilities than in the general population. Also, we know that signs of distress and depression tend to increase as people with disabilities age from young adulthood (18 to 44 years old) into middle age (45 to 64 years old), although we also often see improvement in depression as people age from middle age into older ages (65 years and older). Sleep problems such as difficulty falling asleep and early morning waking are common symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other mood problems.

Some sleep researchers believe that it might be normal to be awake some during the night. (The fact that you sleep straight through the night without budging may again be a sign of inadequate time spent sleeping and increased sleep pressure.) This phenomenon of being awake at night is called "quiet wakefulness" and is often observed when the sleep habits of non-Western cultures are studied. When people sleep in a group in close quarters, there is more time spent awake during the night. This makes sleep a more fluid concept. Time may be spent chatting, eating a snack or engaging others around you. In history, fragmented sleep with periods of wakefulness in the middle of the night was ​common, reflected in the midnight adventures seen in the plays of Shakespeare, for example.
The influence of tryptophan on sleep continues to be studied in major sleep laboratories across the nation. While this amino acid is not available as a natural dietary supplement or sleep remedy, you can easily include tryptophan in your diet through food sources such as turkey, cheese, nuts, beans, eggs, and milk. You can also boost serotonin levels in the brain -- helping you to feel calm and sleepy -- by eating foods rich in carbohydrates.

After being awake for nineteen hours, people who were sleep-deprived were as cognitively impaired as those who were legally drunk… After sixteen hours of being awake, the brain begins to fail. Humans need more than seven hours of sleep each night to maintain cognitive performance. After ten days of just seven hours of sleep, the brain is as dysfunctional as it would be after going without sleep for twenty-four hours.


Of all the sleep tips you could ever read or hear about, the most important one is to stick to one sleep schedule—every day. This means going to bed and waking up at the same time each day. When sleep has a regular rhythm, your biological clock will be in sync and all of your other bodily functions will go smoother, including your sleep. You are probably squirming as you read this tip, thinking about your own sleep issues and how you have anything but a regular sleep routine.
According to the American Sleep Association, one in every three adults experiences occasional insomnia, while another one in 10 has chronic insomnia. While most of us crave a good night’s sleep for the short-term benefit of feeling more alert, we also realize that sleep is crucial to our health. During those nightly hours of shut-eye, our bodies experience a prolonged period of repair and renewal that can improve everything from treatment of chronic conditions to weight management.
You've finally reached your breaking point. After another night spent tossing and turning, a morning where you struggle to get out of bed, and a day fighting sleepiness and fatigue, you are committed to trying to sleep better and fixing your insomnia. This can be a significant and life-changing goal, and it can also be a little intimidating without a plan. Where should you even begin? Fortunately, there are a series of specific changes you can make that will help you to sleep better. Set aside the next 30 days to focus on how to begin to implement this advice You'll discover that you can enjoy the sleep of your dreams.

1. I go to bed later than I had intended. 2. I go to bed early if I have to get up early in the morning. (R) 3. If it is time to turn off the lights at night I do it immediately. (R) 4. Often I am still doing other things when it is time to go to bed. 5. I easily get distracted by things when I actually would like to go to bed. 6. I do not go to bed on time. 7. I have a regular bedtime which I keep to. (R) 8. I want to go to bed on time but I just don't. 9. I can easily stop with my activities when it is time to go to bed.
How long does a cup of coffee keep you awake? Caffeine stimulates the nervous system. People often consume it to stay alert, but how long do effects last, and how does it impact sleep? This depends on many factors, including the amount of caffeine ingested at once and an individual's metabolism. Learn to estimate how long the effects of caffeine last here. Read now
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