All the aforementioned creams are exceptional in dealing with joint pains. Therefore, if you wish to deal with pain experienced on the back, knees, and elbow then any of the creams outlined above would do you some good. Even if you may not be a fun of using pain relief medications the ten distinctive anti-inflammatory creams that have been discussed earlier would make you develop a liking for these types of medication.
A combination of Boswellia and curcumin showed superior efficacy and tolerability compared with nonsteroidal diclofenac for treating active osteoarthritis. Boswellia typically is given as an extract standardized to contain 30-40% boswellic acids (300-500 mg two or three times/day). Boswellia has been well tolerated in most studies, although some people may experience stomach discomfort, including nausea, acid reflux, or diarrhea.[1–10,42,48,56,62,103,104]
NSAID medications have potential side effects, even though many of these medications can be obtained over-the-counter. Some of the side effects are minor, other certainly worrisome. Some people may be more prone to side effects given other medical conditions. For that reason, NSAID medication should be used with caution. If there is ever a question of whether or not it is safe for you to take these medications, and you should discuss this with your doctor. Anyone taking NSAID medications for more than a few days should have a discussion with her physician about the potential for side effects.
Because natural supplements are made of organically existing substances, they affect the body in gentle ways—without side effects. The ingredients within natural remedies for inflammation, pain and anything for that matter often do not work as quickly as drugs do at relieving pain or inflammation. However, they do offer acute relief in the short term while working more powerfully over time to create a gradual and lasting change in condition. In other words, natural supplements need to build up in your system to get to a level where more significant change occurs, which is why you often will need to take them several times per day, over periods of weeks and months or even longer.
A key warning about using topical analgesics: don’t use them if you are also taking an oral NSAID—either prescription or over-the-counter—without telling your doctor. Taking too much of an NSAID can land you in the hospital with stomach bleeding or an ulcer flare-up. In fact, up to 100,000 Americans are hospitalized every year for NSAID-related gastrointestinal problems.
I have pain in booth knees from arthritis. I have used this cream for over a year. All the other pain relievers I have used, don't come close to Topricin for quick and long lasting pain relief. I use it every night and sleep like a baby. I would recommend this product to anyone that needs fast and lasting relief from pain. To me this is a God sent.

Named for its hook-like horns, cat’s claw, a woody vine native to the Amazon rainforest and other places in South America, is known for containing an anti-inflammatory agent that aids in blocking the production of the hormone prostaglandin, which contributes to inflammation and pain within the body. Stick to the suggested doses to avoid diarrhea: 250 to 1,000 mg capsules one to three times daily.

Herbal therapies: “When back spasms are so strong you can barely move from the bed,” Grossman says, she suggests the homeopathic medicine Bryonia; when you have soreness after overexertion, she uses Arnica.  Keep in mind, there’s little scientific evidence that herbals such as Bryonia and Arnica are effective treatments for back pain; though, a study published in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine in 2016 suggested they might help to reduce chronic low back pain from arthritis when combined with physical therapy.
People who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as topical diclofenac (Pennsaid, Voltaren) may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not use these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who use NSAIDs for a long time. Do not use an NSAID such as topical diclofenac if you have recently had a heart attack, unless directed to do so by your doctor.Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, or a stroke; if you smoke; and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of your body, or slurred speech.
Hi iv just had my cast removed following my broken wrist where both bones were broken, im 58 and would like advice on which creams/gels i could safely use to help reduce the swelling in my fingers and hand and help reduce the muscle and tendon stiffness, im already doing exercises but the swelling stops me from being able to do much, im a self employed seamstress so maximising the use of my hand is essential, i cant use ice packs as i have Raynards syndrome, any advice would be very much appreciated, kindest regards
Joints are complicated structures that “rely on bone, muscle, and ligaments all working together to provide a full range of motion,” says Holly Lucille, a Los Angeles-based naturopath. Understanding the source of your joint pain or inflammation is important, she adds, in order to pinpoint the most effective remedy. It could be an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, but in other cases, food sensitivities can be the culprit.
15. Bromelain – This natural pain-reducer comes from the enzymes present in pineapple stems. Research shows that it reduces levels of prostaglandins, which are hormones that induce inflammation. Bromelain may benefit people with arthritis and conditions marked by musculoskeletal tension (like TMJ syndrome), in addition to those suffering trauma-related inflammation. The enzyme also promotes healing in muscles and connective tissues.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are one of the most commonly used types of medications for musculoskeletal conditions. NSAIDs can be effective for a wide variety of orthopedic conditions from arthritis, tendinitis, or other inflammatory conditions. Determining the best NSAID for your condition may depend on a number of different factors, and what works well for one individual may not be the best medication for another. There are possible side effects of different NSAID medications the patient should be aware of, and you should discuss with your physician if taking these medications for more than a short period of time.


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