Meditation and mindfulness. Mindfulness meditation, which focuses on awareness of the present moment, can reduce the way we perceive pain. In one study, only four days of training led to a 40% reduction in pain rating and a 57% reduction in pain-unpleasantness.[14] This kind of meditation can help you to control back pain, fibromyalgia, and migraines. Read more about meditation and mindfulness for pain control here.
Hi Paul, This is not a condition I’m very familiar with. I’ve done a bit of research for you and found that most people will regain up to 70-90% of their original strength and functional levels within two years. The same reference suggests that ‘Specific pain medications used to treat PTS include opiates and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are usually used in combination. … After the acute phase, different medications such as gabapentin, carbamazepine, and amitryptiline may be used specifically to treat nerve pain.’ It’s possible that diclofenac gel will help the pain – this is the most effective topical NSAID available without prescription. Your doctor can prescribe other versions. Nerve pain is difficult to treat topically, although capsaicin cream (chilli extract) is prescribed to treat other forms of nerve pain eg related to shingles. Physio will help the nerves to recover – a medical herbalist may be able to suggest herbal creams that might promote nerve regrowth. Hope that helps.

An ayurvedic spice known to tame arthritis pain, the curry spice turmeric contains an antioxidant compound called curcumin. In an animal-based study published in 2007, scientists discovered that curcumin can overpower pro-inflammatory proteins called cytokines. The compound may also help decrease pain associated with autoimmune disorders and tendonitis.


Or how can we select the best pain relief cream for back pain that has no harmful side effects and works fast? But the best pain relief cream is such a remedy that relieves you from any kind of chronic pains. They are offering you a cooling sensation in the affected area. It also comes with a pleasant scent which is also known as the best pain relief cream for knees as well.

While most people are only looking to relieve the immediate symptoms of the pain, this will only provide temporary relief.  Addressing the underlying mental/emotional, chemical and physical stressors that are causing the chronic inflammation and pain is the ultimate goal.  This process takes time and deep introspection along with trusted holistic health care providers.


"My go-to muscle soothing product is Topricin Pain Relief Cream ($17; topicrin.com) as it is a combination of 11 homeopathic ingredients proven to be safe for your skin. I typically apply it to my lower back (where I've had trauma) before I go running and again before bed. I'm a believer!" —Kira Stokes, creator of The Stoked Method (Try her 30-day plank challenge to score tighter abs, faster.)
For cinnamon to be used in the diet to reduce pain, it should be in powdered form, and should be the Ceylon variety, not cassia. Cassia is the most common form and is less expensive, but toxicity can be of concern when cassia is consumed in large quantities. Ceylon cinnamon presents no toxicity risks and has more potent health benefits. (22) Ceylon cinnamon is the preferred supplemental form, and for best results, one should take approximately 1-2 teaspoons per day.
An ayurvedic spice known to tame arthritis pain, the curry spice turmeric contains an antioxidant compound called curcumin. In an animal-based study published in 2007, scientists discovered that curcumin can overpower pro-inflammatory proteins called cytokines. The compound may also help decrease pain associated with autoimmune disorders and tendonitis.
Glucosamine is one of the most-studied supplements around the world for relief of arthritis symptoms and joint health. Sulfur is produced naturally in the body and is an essential component to joint health. Glucosamine sulfate is a type of glucosamine that is most useful in the support of joint mobility and pain relief because it absorbs well. Conversely, glucosamine chondroitin does not absorb in an amount significant enough to create enough of a change to make taking it worthwhile. Glucosamine sulfate works as well as NSAIDs for some people but without the negative effects to the gastrointestinal tract or liver.
studies and meta-analyses report a strong relationship between chronic pain and abnormalities in glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance and abnormal blood sugar pave the way for inflammatory pathways, resulting in chronic pain. Magnesium deficiency is another that comes to mind. Magnesium helps to block the brain’s receptors of glutamate, a neurotransmitter that may cause your neurons to become hypersensitive to pain. Intestinal integrity is one that many people don’t think to connect to their pain. However, high-quality food choices are crucial for managing pain due to the way they influence gut health. Substances in grains may increase intestinal permeability, allowing undigested food particles, bacteria, and other molecules to enter the bloodstream, which can influence inflammation and chronic pain.
For short-term pain relief, over-the-counter pain relievers including acetaminophen and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are sometimes suggested. The most common NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve). Potential side effects of NSAIDs include stomach and liver problems. Talk to your doctor if you don't find relief after taking the recommended dose.

Having a variety of solutions for pain relief is not only helpful, it’s strategic. Depending on which type of pain you’re experiencing, you want a personalized option. And having different solutions on hand helps you be prepared for whatever life throws at you. Try adding an external pain relief cream to the mix so you can relieve muscle and joint pain, then get back to doing what you love.


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