An essential nutrient available in certain foods (such as fortified milk and fish with small bones), vitamin D is produced naturally by the body during exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays. But since it's difficult to obtain your recommended daily intake of D solely through dietary sources and sun exposure, many medical experts recommend increasing your vitamin D levels by taking a dietary supplement.
The original Aspirin, white willow bark contains salicin which, in the stomach, converts to salicylic acid—the primary component of Aspirin. Synthetically, it can irritate the stomach, but naturally through white willow bark, it is effective in relieving pain, inflammation and fever. The recommended dose is 1 to 2 dropperfuls of white willow bark tincture daily.
It’s the breakthrough technology used that makes this patch so ideal for pain management without traditional painkillers. Energy medicine technology, based off of quantum physics, harnesses the signatures of over 200 natural remedies known for their anti-inflammation properties, like turmeric, vitamin D, magnesium, and Omega-3. These remedies are transferred through a resonant carrier wave onto the patch. The electrons from all these energies are activated once the patch is applied to the skin. It then works with your body’s natural healing process to bring you fast, fast pain relief.
Magnesium supplements can help curb the pain of migraines, muscle spasms and fibromyalgia. “It’s really easy to be magnesium deficient,” Tanya Edwards, MD, medical director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, told WebMD. Heavy consumption of alcohol lowers magnesium levels. “The foods that are highest in magnesium are things like sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds. Most of us just don’t eat those very often.”

This substance comes from edible hot peppers and helps to reduce a substance in the body that works to produce pain. Be careful with gels and creams that contain this substance, you must wash your hands after using, especially before touching sensitive areas of the body. Some people may also experience adverse reactions to this ingredient. When first using a gel or cream with capsaicin use just a small amount in a small area to see how you react to it.
Its active ingredients include eucalyptus oil and tea tree oil, but nothing that will heat up your skin or provide the icy, cooling sensation that some other arthritis creams do. It comes in a roller-ball format, which you use to massage the product into the skin. Devoted fans say it’s the best pain-relief cream on the market, and they love that it doesn’t come with a lingering medicinal scent.
People who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as topical diclofenac (Pennsaid, Voltaren) may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not use these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who use NSAIDs for a long time. Do not use an NSAID such as topical diclofenac if you have recently had a heart attack, unless directed to do so by your doctor.Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, or a stroke; if you smoke; and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of your body, or slurred speech.

While these are not the only risks NSAID medications, they are somewhat more common, and some of the more worrisome, side effects. It is always safest to have a discussion with your physician if you have any concerns about the risk of taking these medications. It is important to understand that even in healthy people without underlying medical conditions, there is always the risk associated with any medication. The benefits of taking an anti-inflammatory medication need to be balanced with the possible risks of taking the medication.
These creams can be quite effective for temporary pain relief on the muscle and joints. The creams would also come in handy when handling inflammations that may be brought forth by minor injuries, sunburn, skin rash and other severe conditions. Although doctors would prescribe most of these creams for their patients, more often than not individuals go for the OTC medications to deal with simple medical conditions. When making your purchase for this particular product it is important that you make a comparison between active ingredients and the inactive ingredients used in the formulation of the cream. At the end of the day, ensure that you choose a product that would not have dire side effects on your health. The cream you choose should help you deal with your particular problem in the best way possible and if possible you should make sure that you consult with your doctor before using any of these creams.

Acupuncture: Acupuncture may provide even more relief than painkillers, according to one 2013 review. In 11 studies of more than 1,100 people, this Chinese medicine staple improved symptoms of lower back pain better than simulated treatments and, yes, in some cases, NSAIDs. The needles appear to change the way your nerves react and may reduce inflammation around joints (which is only one of the therapy's benefits), says DeStefano.

Many readers assume that “skeptics” will always favour mainstream and pharmaceutical treatments like Voltaren, but nothing could be further from the truth. Indeed, some skeptics are leading the charge against bad pharmaceutical industry science and practices (and a great example is Ben Goldacre’s new book, Bad Pharma: How drug companies mislead doctors and harm patients). Pharmacist Scott Gavura of Science-Based Pharmacy was certainly skeptical about topical NSAIDs like Voltaren when he first tackled the topic early in 2011.13 “When I recently noticed a topical NSAID appear for sale as an over-the-counter treatment for muscle aches and pains … I was confident it would make a good case study in bad science.”
I’m not saying NSAIDs are useless. They have their place. If you’re recovering from surgery or a major injury, traditional over-the-counter pain relievers are good for controlling inflammation, swelling, and pain, but NSAIDs are far too powerful for over-the-counter, everyday use. Unlike a lot of natural pain relievers, NSAIDs also don’t address the cause of inflammation or pain; they just mask the symptoms.
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