"Arnicare Gel ($8; target.com) had me at first application. It not only works great to help relieve any muscle pain and swelling, but it also has no scent and isn't greasy. I can apply it at night or even before a workout." —Derek DeGrazio, celebrity trainer, Barry's Bootcamp Miami Beach (See his Barry's Bootcamp-Inspired Abs, Butt, and Core Workout.)
Talking about your back pain with a therapist may bring some relief. In a UK study, back pain sufferers who had 90 minutes of group cognitive behavioral therapy a week for six weeks reported less pain during the treatment. (Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on solving problems by changing thoughts and behavior.) A year later, 59% said their pain was totally cured, compared to just 31% in the group that did not go through therapy.

Try taking one 250-milligram capsule of valerian four times a day. Some scientists claim that this herb’s active ingredient interacts with receptors in the brain to cause a sedating effect. Although sedatives are not generally recommended, valerian is much milder than any pharmaceutical product. (Valerian can also be made into a tea, but the smell is so strong-resembling overused gym socks-that capsules are vastly preferable.)
Ingredients:Active ingredients (in cream): Belladonna 3X, Capsicum 3X, Colocynthis 3X, Gnaphalium Polycephalum 3X, Hypericum Perforatum 3X, Magnesia Phosphorica 3X, Rhus Tox 3X. Inactive ingredients Water, Polyacrylamide, C13-14 Isoparaffin, Propylene Glycol, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Capsicum Annuum Resin, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Oil, Laureth-7, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Folic Acid, Retinyl Palmitate, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract, Achillea Millefolium Extract, Sambucus Nigra Flower Extract, Foeniculum Vulgare (Fennel) Seed Extract, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Flower Extract, Rosa Canina Flower Extract, Ger anium Maculatum Extract.
Creams derived from natural products can also provide local relief for painful muscles in fibromyalgia. The best part is that topical treatments tend to be very well tolerated with few side effects. Arnica is an herb used since the 1500s to treat bruises, muscle pain, and inflammation. It is still used today as a natural treatment for muscle pain in many different topical remedies. One herbal homeopathic cream that I have found helpful is MyPainAway Fibro cream. It includes arnica to reduce muscle pain, echinacea to reduce inflammation, along with other herbs targeted to reduce nerve pain by improving microcirculation around pain-sensing nerves.

Cognitive behavioral therapy can benefit your health and well being in numerous ways. It is a therapeutic technique that helps you to identify negative thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and learn how to replace them with productive alternatives. Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective treatment for chronic pain,[15,16] as you learn to respond less to your pain and live a life less controlled by your pain.
“I cannot even tell you how AMAZING this stuff is. I never do reviews, but this product most certainly deserves one. I have dealt with MANY injuries, I was in a bad car wreck, and I have had more surgeries than I could count on both hands. My main area of pain is my upper back and neck. I have bulging disks, cervical stenosis, degenerative disk disease that causes horrible spasms, swelling, tension, and PAIN. I also have cancer and several other issues that put my pain level over the top every day. I have seen neurosurgeons, all of whom say they will eventually need to operate. I have done absolutely every possible treatment other than a spinal fusion, have had probably 10 injections, and they even went and tried to burn the nerve endings throughout my entire cervical spine, yet nothing worked. I can't even begin to tell you the medications the doctors have tried, each of which help some, but you get to a point where you don't want to constantly take medications forever. One day I was at my spine doctor's office and they had a bottle of Relief pain cream on the counter. While I was waiting there I asked the staff some questions about Relief and thought "yea, yea, but can I try it?" So, I put some on, and thought, "HOLY COW! What is this! Whatever this is, it's amazing!" Then and there I literally bought the rest of the supply they had on-hand because I couldn't believe how much it helped relieve my pains and aches. That night, I couldn't sleep because I was in so much pain, and none of my medications were helping. I felt like I was dying. So again, I put on some Relief cream and it helped soooo much. Since that day I never, ever, go anywhere without Relief! I will use this pain cream forever and continue to tell everyone I know about it because it truly works! I'm so glad I randomly tried this stuff at the doctor's office because I finally found something that gives true RELIEF!!” *

Side effects from topical medications include redness, itching, and other skin irritation. They are generally mild—and uncommon. The cause of skin irritation is often the material used to make the cream or gel, not the NSAID, says Dr. Joanne Borg-Stein, medical director of the Harvard-affiliated Spaulding-Wellesley Rehabilitation Center in Massachusetts. When that happens, it’s possible for a pharmacist to create a preparation with ingredients that are less irritating to your skin.

Pycnogenol, like white willow bark, is a nutraceutical material that has been used since ancient times. Pycnogenol is derived from the bark of the maritime pine tree (Pinus maritima) and has been used for more than 2000 years. It has been considered helpful for wound healing, treating scurvy, healing of ulcers, and reducing vascular inflammation. It contains a potent blend of active polyphenols, which includes catechin, taxifolin, procyanidins, and phenolic acids. It is one of the most potent antioxidant compounds currently known.[17,118]
A muscle pain relief cream will alleviate aches and pains associated with sore muscles, injuries, inflammation, and more! The best muscle pain relief cream is the one that suits your unique needs. Some offer heating or cooling sensations, while others are odorless or made with natural oils to produce pleasant scents. A pain relief cream can also reduce arthritis discomfort! With plenty of creams to choose from, we've rounded up the top creams. You're sure to find the one that meets your needs in this list.
4. Devil’s Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens) – This ominous sounding herb is actually great for treating numerous health conditions, among them are liver problems and heart burn. It also has anti-inflammatory effects and can reduce pain from arthritis, headaches, and low back discomfort. The University of Maryland Medical Center has published several studies that had great success treating Osteoarthritis with Devil’s Claw.
Maybe. They may not completely get rid of your monster headache but they may help relieve some of the aches that come with them. Some people who experience migrains also have neck and shoulder pain and topical pain relief gels and creams may help to lessen this symptom. Some migraine sufferers use roll-ons on the forehead or back of the head to induce a cooling or heating sensation to help cope with the pain.
Although it is fine to try these herbs while also taking a prescription arthritis or pain medication, if you go that route, Dr. Teitelbaum suggests using both the herb and medication for six weeks to reach the full effect of the herb. Then try tapering off the conventional pain medication to see if the herb alone can do the trick. Skip turmeric if you have gallstones.

NSAID medications have potential side effects, even though many of these medications can be obtained over-the-counter. Some of the side effects are minor, other certainly worrisome. Some people may be more prone to side effects given other medical conditions. For that reason, NSAID medication should be used with caution. If there is ever a question of whether or not it is safe for you to take these medications, and you should discuss this with your doctor. Anyone taking NSAID medications for more than a few days should have a discussion with her physician about the potential for side effects.


Find support and understanding.. Unlike a broken leg or other obvious sign of injury, chronic pain is usually unseen. It is a profoundly personal—and often lonely—experience. For many, it is difficult to find support and understanding from family and friends who may be well intentioned but don't really get what you're dealing with. If this is the case for you, we encourage you to find your own group of people who can be supportive and understanding. There may be a chronic pain support group at your local hospital or church. Or you may prefer to interact online. You may get started with a local or online forum seeking help, and then go on to find that you have a lot to contribute, and helping others is also a way to help yourself.
Having the best pain relief gel or cream in your household or any other place is a must. You can also keep this remedy in your office or in your purse as you don’t know when you have pain. Of course, suffering from a back pain is a one of the worst one. So you should always have a cream near you. Suppose due to work you get tired. You hit yourself somewhere and the entire day gets ruined. For this reason, you need to have a cream near to you as you can use it immediately and get relief from severe pain.

I have pain in booth knees from arthritis. I have used this cream for over a year. All the other pain relievers I have used, don't come close to Topricin for quick and long lasting pain relief. I use it every night and sleep like a baby. I would recommend this product to anyone that needs fast and lasting relief from pain. To me this is a God sent.
Hi iv just had my cast removed following my broken wrist where both bones were broken, im 58 and would like advice on which creams/gels i could safely use to help reduce the swelling in my fingers and hand and help reduce the muscle and tendon stiffness, im already doing exercises but the swelling stops me from being able to do much, im a self employed seamstress so maximising the use of my hand is essential, i cant use ice packs as i have Raynards syndrome, any advice would be very much appreciated, kindest regards

Beauty Breeze brings this exquisite muscle cream that emerges as a distinctive one for the factuality of getting crafted from peerless pain-soothing herbs and functional emollients extracted from Cajput, Clove, Mint and Cassia. Enriched by the nimbleness of Thai masseurs, this ‘Tiger Balm’ class cream for sore muscles is also lab-tested to be effective over severe type migraines. The reddish consistency muscle cream is accredited as an ‘Extra Strength’ one and is especially operative over abdominal cramps, spinal ache and joint inflammation. Vended in a unique edged carton-pattern container, the cream for sore muscles has a 30 gram density. It has a measure dynamics of 3 x 3 x 4.1 inches and a menthol aroma.
When you think of a needle poking into your skin, the last thing you probably think about is natural pain relief. The truth is, though, that dry needling works by stimulating trigger points to reduce pain or disability. A 2007 study found dry needling significantly reduced shoulder pain by targeting a trigger point. Dry needling can also help deal with trigger points that reduce a person’s range of motion, which can lead to serious pain and musculoskeletal side effects.

As I write in this month’s Harvard Men’s Health Watch, these so-called topical analgesics work best for more superficial joints like the knees, ankles, feet, elbows, and hands. “In those areas, the medication can penetrate closer to the joint,” says Dr. Rosalyn Nguyen, a clinical instructor in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School.

Many readers assume that “skeptics” will always favour mainstream and pharmaceutical treatments like Voltaren, but nothing could be further from the truth. Indeed, some skeptics are leading the charge against bad pharmaceutical industry science and practices (and a great example is Ben Goldacre’s new book, Bad Pharma: How drug companies mislead doctors and harm patients). Pharmacist Scott Gavura of Science-Based Pharmacy was certainly skeptical about topical NSAIDs like Voltaren when he first tackled the topic early in 2011.13 “When I recently noticed a topical NSAID appear for sale as an over-the-counter treatment for muscle aches and pains … I was confident it would make a good case study in bad science.”
Zeng C, Wei J, Persson MS, et al. Relative efficacy and safety of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for osteoarthritis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies. Br J Sports Med. 2018 Feb. PubMed #29436380. “Topical NSAIDs were effective and safe for OA. Diclofenac patches may be the most effective topical NSAID for pain relief. No serious gastrointestinal and renal AEs were observed in trials or the general population.” BACK TO TEXT

tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: acetaminophen (Tylenol, in other products); angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril, enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril, lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril, in Prinzide and Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc, in Uniretic), perindopril (Aceon, in Prestalia), quinapril (Accupril, in Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); angiotensin receptor blockers such as candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, in Benicar HCT, in Tribenzor), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT, in Twynsta), and valsartan (in Exforge HCT); certain antibiotics, beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, in Tenoretic), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), and propranolol (Hemangeol, Inderal, Innopran); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); diuretics ('water pills'); lithium (Lithobid); medications for seizures, and methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.


This is a good option for anyone suffering from minor arthritis pain or sore muscles. It has no odor and is perfect for rubbing into the back to relieve backaches and pain. This product does not use any heating or cooling feature, so it is perfect for someone who wants a smell-free pain relief cream without a lot of added features. People have been using this cream for decades, and many continue to prefer it.
Chill it. Ice is best in the first 24 to 48 hours after an injury because it reduces inflammation, says E. Anne Reicherter, PhD, PT, DPT, associate professor of Physical Therapy at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "Even though the warmth feels good because it helps cover up the pain and it does help relax the muscles, the heat actually inflames the inflammatory processes," she says. After 48 hours, you can switch to heat if you prefer. Whether you use heat or ice -- take it off after about 20 minutes to give your skin a rest. If pain persists, talk with a doctor.

I am a science writer and a former Registered Massage Therapist with a decade of experience treating tough pain cases. I was the Assistant Editor of ScienceBasedMedicine.org for several years. I’ve written hundreds of articles and several books, and I’m known for readable but heavily referenced analysis, with a touch of sass. I am a runner and ultimate player. • more about me • more about PainScience.com


Capsaicin. Derived from hot chile peppers, topical capsaicin may be useful for some people in relieving pain. "Capsaicin works by depleting substance P, a compound that conveys the pain sensation from the peripheral to the central nervous system. It takes a couple of days for this to occur," says David Kiefer, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine at the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

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