Music therapy is a low-cost natural therapy that may reduce some of the stress of chronic pain in conjunction with other treatments. Studies find that it may reduce the disability, anxiety, and depression associated with chronic pain. It is thought to help because it can shift attention away from the unpleasant sensations of pain, and it may cause the release of endorphins or changes in catecholamine levels.
In a 2011 research review published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia, investigators looked at the available research on the use of topically applied capsaicin in the treatment of several types of chronic pain. This included two clinical trials examining back pain, both of which found that capsaicin helped reduce low back pain without causing notable side effects.
Cognitive behavioral therapy can benefit your health and well being in numerous ways. It is a therapeutic technique that helps you to identify negative thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and learn how to replace them with productive alternatives. Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective treatment for chronic pain,[15,16] as you learn to respond less to your pain and live a life less controlled by your pain.

Meditation and mindfulness. Mindfulness meditation, which focuses on awareness of the present moment, can reduce the way we perceive pain. In one study, only four days of training led to a 40% reduction in pain rating and a 57% reduction in pain-unpleasantness.[14] This kind of meditation can help you to control back pain, fibromyalgia, and migraines. Read more about meditation and mindfulness for pain control here.
Release your inner endorphins. Endorphins are the natural pain relievers produced by your body. They work by binding to the opioid receptors in your brain to block the perception of pain, similar to opioid pain medications, such as oxycodone or morphine. Spurring increased production of these natural hormones can substantially help reduce your pain, as well as produce profound feelings of pleasure and satisfaction.1
Feverfew. Feverfew has been used for centuries to treat headaches, stomachaches, and toothaches. Nowadays it's also used for migraines and rheumatoid arthritis. More studies are required to confirm whether feverfew is actually effective, but the herb may be worth trying since it hasn't been associated with serious side effects. Mild side effects include canker sores and irritation of the tongue and lips. Pregnant women should avoid this remedy.
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"I love Elemental Herbs All Good Herbal Freeze with Arnica ($20; allgoodproducts.com) because the combination of menthol and arnica is incredibly cooling. Also, it's all-natural and super easy to just spray onto my sore areas. I also like Arnica Muscle and Joint Gel by Naturopathica ($28; naturopathica.com), which is a gel. You can rub it in and it really targets the sore muscles and joints." —Holly Rilinger, master Flywheel instructor, creator of LIFTED
Whether it was brought on by arthritis, a structural or nerve problem, bending the wrong way, or lifting something a little too heavy, low back pain is frustrating as all get-out. But if you're struggling, know this: You're definitely not alone. Most people experience back pain at some point in their lives, and it's one of the most common reasons people book doctor's appointments and call out of work. It's also one of the leading causes of disability worldwide.
Soft tissue therapies help treat the underlying causes of back pain, such as poor posture, muscular compensations, and weakness through manipulative, hands-on adjustments. These natural therapies can help “turn on” muscles that have been “turned off” due to past injuries and therefore eliminate added stress on painful parts of the back or legs. I recommend finding a practitioner who offers one of the following:
Hi Shelie, Sorry to hear about your fracture. Comfrey cream is traditionally used to boost healing and is known as ‘knitbone’. It contains allantoin – a substance which is also beneficial for Raynaud’s. As described in my post, a trial showed rapid reduction in pain, and more effectiveness than for diclofenac gel in reducing symptoms associated with ankle sprain. A cream will sink in better than an ointment if you are working as a seamstress. Best wishes, Sarah B
Side effects from topical medications include redness, itching, and other skin irritation. They are generally mild—and uncommon. The cause of skin irritation is often the material used to make the cream or gel, not the NSAID, says Dr. Joanne Borg-Stein, medical director of the Harvard-affiliated Spaulding-Wellesley Rehabilitation Center in Massachusetts. When that happens, it’s possible for a pharmacist to create a preparation with ingredients that are less irritating to your skin.
Most of us spend a good part of our day sitting down, which may be more harmful than you realize. You can minimize the impact by maintaining good posture. Correct posture in a chair means having all the bones in your spine lined up neatly, like a stack of perfectly aligned blocks. You should keep your feet flat on the floor and your computer keyboard within easy reach so you’re not leaning forward or slumping. This is part of proper office ergonomics.
An ayurvedic spice known to tame arthritis pain, the curry spice turmeric contains an antioxidant compound called curcumin. In an animal-based study published in 2007, scientists discovered that curcumin can overpower pro-inflammatory proteins called cytokines. The compound may also help decrease pain associated with autoimmune disorders and tendonitis.
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