Because natural supplements are made of organically existing substances, they affect the body in gentle ways—without side effects. The ingredients within natural remedies for inflammation, pain and anything for that matter often do not work as quickly as drugs do at relieving pain or inflammation. However, they do offer acute relief in the short term while working more powerfully over time to create a gradual and lasting change in condition. In other words, natural supplements need to build up in your system to get to a level where more significant change occurs, which is why you often will need to take them several times per day, over periods of weeks and months or even longer.
Digging a metal tool into a painful spot, such as the bottom of your foot if you’re dealing with plantar fasciitis, sounds like some sort of medieval torture practice. The Graston technique is an instrument-aided manual therapy that serves as a noninvasive way to deal with soft tissue ailments like achilles tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, shin splints, back and shoulder pain, and other ailments. It’s even been proven to help relieve pain associated with chronic conditions like trigger finger and post-surgery pain in a way that can reduce the amount of painkillers administered.
When you think of a needle poking into your skin, the last thing you probably think about is natural pain relief. The truth is, though, that dry needling works by stimulating trigger points to reduce pain or disability. A 2007 study found dry needling significantly reduced shoulder pain by targeting a trigger point. Dry needling can also help deal with trigger points that reduce a person’s range of motion, which can lead to serious pain and musculoskeletal side effects.
Too much tension and tightness can cause back pain. "Our goal in increasing flexibility is to put an equal load throughout the body from the feet all the way up to the head,” Davis says. “One good exercise is to sit on the edge of the bed with one leg extended and the other one on the floor. Give your hamstrings a stretch by leaning forward while keeping your back in a neutral position.”

A lot of people who read this are going to want to try it on their low back pain, neck pain, and/or other kinds of muscle pain. Will it work? The only honest answer is, “Who knows?” I have no clinical experience with this yet, and certainly it’s unstudied. It might be worth trying, in moderation, with the full awareness that there’s every possibility that it could be a waste of time and money.
Vitamin E is a fat-soluble and essential nutrient for humans. The most important components of vitamin E appear to be the tocopherols. All four forms of tocopherol have been shown to have antioxidant activity, but alphatocopherol is the strongest antioxidant. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of LDL, which can help prevent LDL from sticking to the arterial walls. In addition to its antioxidant properties, vitamin E also acts to reduce blood coagulation and may help to lower blood pressure by eliciting endothelial relaxation.
Curcumin has also been suggested as a treatment for colitis, chronic neurodegenerative diseases, arthritis, and cancer. In addition, it regulates the activity of several enzymes and cytokines by inhibiting both COX-1 and COX-2. Most studies to date have been performed in animals, but given the centuries of use of curcumin, as well as its now demonstrated activity in the NF-kB, COX-1, and COX-2 inflammatory pathways, it may be considered a viable natural alternative to nonsteroidal agents for the treatment of inflammation.
Nearly everyone suffers from some type of back pain at some point in their lives. But no matter when it appears or what may have caused it, back pain can be a real, well … pain to deal with. The good news? There are several simple things you can do to ease pain and keep your back in good condition. The following tips can help you get on the way toward feeling better.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have shown efficacy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) pain but are also associated with a dose-dependent risk of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematologic, hepatic, and renal adverse events (AEs). Topical NSAIDs were developed to provide analgesia similar to their oral counterparts with less systemic exposure and fewer serious AEs. Topical NSAIDs have long been available in Europe for the management of OA, and guidelines of the European League Against Rheumatism and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International specify that topical NSAIDs are preferred over oral NSAIDs for patients with knee or hand OA of mild-to-moderate severity, few affected joints, and/or a history of sensitivity to oral NSAIDs.
Even though it is important to strive for quality when shopping for different types of products on the market, it is equally important that you think about your budget before making any purchase. Make sure that what you buy like, in this case, the anti-inflammatory cream does not overstretch your existing budget. Once you find the brand that is within your price range, the next thing to ascertain to would be to ensure that the reasonably priced brand is effective and would not have adverse side effects on your health. Nevertheless, just keep in mind that there are counterfeits products available on the market. Therefore, it is vital to watch out for such products so that you do not become a victim of purchasing counterfeit goods so that you would have not only wasted your money but you may end up with a product that may have dire consequences to your health. The best way you could avoid being duped with the unscrupulous dealers is by consulting with your doctor who would advise you best on the anti-inflammatory cream that would adequately serve your needs regardless of the price at which it might be sold on the market.

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Hi Paul, This is not a condition I’m very familiar with. I’ve done a bit of research for you and found that most people will regain up to 70-90% of their original strength and functional levels within two years. The same reference suggests that ‘Specific pain medications used to treat PTS include opiates and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are usually used in combination. … After the acute phase, different medications such as gabapentin, carbamazepine, and amitryptiline may be used specifically to treat nerve pain.’ It’s possible that diclofenac gel will help the pain – this is the most effective topical NSAID available without prescription. Your doctor can prescribe other versions. Nerve pain is difficult to treat topically, although capsaicin cream (chilli extract) is prescribed to treat other forms of nerve pain eg related to shingles. Physio will help the nerves to recover – a medical herbalist may be able to suggest herbal creams that might promote nerve regrowth. Hope that helps.

Hi Pauline, sorry to hear about your knee. Yes, capsaicin/capsicum cause stimulation of nerves endings so their chemicals are depleted and they reduce the level of pain messages they send on. The brain also naturally dismisses persistent signals. Some people do find it irritating, however, but better than the traditional treatments that mimic this action -bee stings and nettles! Best wishes, Sarah B
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