I am in my mid 50’s and was recently diagnosed with arthritis in both my knees. My left knee was the absolute worse. Seems squats and lunges are the worst for arthritic knees and my worst pain followed these exercises. Since then I have gotten a personal trainer so that I won’t hurt myself trying to workout. Anyway, I am a 5k runner and I want to continue. But let me tell you guys about the topical regimen that I am using that I employed just short of going to get a cortisone injection. Magnesium Oil, MSM lotion and organic silica gel. I got all of these products from an on-line source of organic foods, products and such. I absolutely love their products and these 3 products have made my knee feel like I never was diagnosed with arthritis, and I’ve been following this morning and night application of the 3 products for a little over two weeks now. Let me tell you, I couldn’t sleep at night because of the pain. Now it’s the difference between night and day. I hope this helps someone
"Yoga Tune Up Therapy Balls ($15; yogatuneup.com). Hands down. They're like a surgeon's scalpel to your fascia. I use them on myself and with clients both pre-and post- workout to improve soft tissue and enhance mobility. They've really helped change my body for the better. Also, they're super easy to travel with." — Adam Rosante, fitness and nutrition coach and best-selling author of The 30 Second Body (BTW, we've got exclusive HIIT moves from his book here.)

Whether you’re a runner looking for a quick solution to cure your muscle soreness or someone with chronic pain, a topical pain gel or cream is a great temporary relief option. These excellent products work very well and have given many runners relief from pain during the recovery process from various types of injuries. Bringing quick relief to sore or aching muscles requires a cream or gel which has the ability to be quickly absorbed and reaches deep into your tissue to help muscle pain.


Staying in bed for any prolonged period can make you stiff and increase pain. When you don’t move and bend, you lose muscle strength and flexibility. With bed rest, you lose about 1 percent of your muscle strength each day. And you can lose 20 to 30 percent in a week. It becomes more difficult to return to any activity. As you become weaker and stiffer your recovery takes longer.

Veritas Health publishes original and accessible health related content written by more than 100 physician authors and peer-reviewed by a 16 member Medical Advisory Board. The Veritas Health platform comprising of Spine-health.com, Arthritis-health.com, Sports-health.com, and Pain-health.com, provides comprehensive information on back pain, arthritis, sports injuries, and chronic pain conditions. For more information visit Veritashealth.com.
Stretch. Don't sit slumped in your desk chair all day. Get up every 20 minutes or so and stretch the other way. "Because most of us spend a lot of time bending forward in our jobs, it's important to stand up and stretch backward throughout the day," Reicherter says. Don't forget to also stretch your legs. Some people find relief from their back pain by doing a regular stretching routine, like yoga.
Pain is a leading cause of insomnia—difficulty with falling asleep and/or staying asleep. Approximately two-thirds of people with chronic back pain suffer from some type of sleep disorder. Paradoxically, inadequate sleep can make your back pain worse. This vicious cycle makes it ineffective to treat just the pain. If you have sleep problems, you need to get the sleep problems addressed too.
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Most of us spend a good part of our day sitting down, which may be more harmful than you realize. You can minimize the impact by maintaining good posture. Correct posture in a chair means having all the bones in your spine lined up neatly, like a stack of perfectly aligned blocks. You should keep your feet flat on the floor and your computer keyboard within easy reach so you’re not leaning forward or slumping. This is part of proper office ergonomics.

Massage: There's an upside to your discomfort: It's a legit excuse to get a weekly massage. One study found that people who did had less lower back pain and disability after 10 weeks, compared with the control group—and general relaxation rubdowns worked just as well as structural massage targeted at specific parts of the body. Osteopathic and chiropractic therapies—in which joints and muscles get stretched and repositioned—have been shown to work, too. In a study published in the Annals of Family Medicine


Warning: The gel is for external use only. It is flammable therefore keep it away from heat or open flames. Check with your healthcare provider before using it if you have sensitive skin are pregnant or breastfeeding. Do not put it near your eyes or mucous membranes or apply to wounds, sores, scratched or imperfect skin. Do not use this product with other creams, sprays, liniments, or ointments. Never put a bandage over the area. Stop using if your skin becomes red, has a rash, or feels irritated. Never use with a heating pad on top of the area and always wash your hands after using. Contact your doctor if problems continue after use. Consult your pediatrician if your child is under 2-years-old. Keep out of the reach of children.

Although it is fine to try these herbs while also taking a prescription arthritis or pain medication, if you go that route, Dr. Teitelbaum suggests using both the herb and medication for six weeks to reach the full effect of the herb. Then try tapering off the conventional pain medication to see if the herb alone can do the trick. Skip turmeric if you have gallstones.
The use of both over-the-counter and prescription nonsteroidal medications is frequently recommended in a typical neurosurgical practice. But persistent long-term use safety concerns must be considered when prescribing these medications for chronic and degenerative pain conditions. This article is a literature review of the biochemical pathways of inflammatory pain, the potentially serious side effects of nonsteroidal drugs and commonly used and clinically studied natural alternative anti-inflammatory supplements. Although nonsteroidal medications can be effective, herbs and dietary supplements may offer a safer, and often an effective, alternative treatment for pain relief, especially for long-term use.
Try taking one 250-milligram capsule of valerian four times a day. Some scientists claim that this herb’s active ingredient interacts with receptors in the brain to cause a sedating effect. Although sedatives are not generally recommended, valerian is much milder than any pharmaceutical product. (Valerian can also be made into a tea, but the smell is so strong-resembling overused gym socks-that capsules are vastly preferable.)

“I was first introduced to Relief by my Chiropractor after I pulled a muscle. Later my son, while playing hockey, received a very nasty hit during a game and was given Biofreeze as part of his recovery process. I can tell you Relief is 10x better—he was still in pain after using the Biofreeze, so I grabbed the Relief and he could not believe the difference. Now we are a Relief ONLY household. I am spreading the word to all the other hockey mom’s on the quality of your product and how well it works. Thank you for creating Relief and keep up the good work.” *
Within the cartilage around your joints is a chemical known as chondroitin. Chondroitin is naturally produced by the body. As you age, your natural supply starts to plummet. And a loss of chondroitin from cartilage is linked to a major cause of joint pain. Moreover, through wear and tear the joint cartilage breaks down, resulting in the condition of Osteoarthritis. We can’t regenerate cartilage on our own, but we can take a supplement called chondroitin sulfate which, studies show, can help slow down this degenerative process and help naturally reduce arthritic pain. Chondroitin sulfate is made from the cartilage of cows and other animals, and is often used in combination with other products including glucosamine and manganese.
This information is not designed to replace a physician's independent judgment about the appropriateness or risks of a procedure for a given patient. Always consult your doctor about your medical conditions or back problem. SpineUniverse does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use of the SpineUniverse.com site is conditional upon your acceptance of our User Agreement
Ginger is in the same family of anti-inflammatory spices as turmeric. While they share similar benefits, ginger is well known for its ability to relieve nausea associated with pregnancy and cancer treatments. It can also relieve pain in the same category as NSAIDs, making it another effective alternative to over-the-counter medications that have unpleasant side effects. (18)
A study involving 172 people with osteoarthritis of the knee compared the use of a arnica gel with a prescribed, nonsteroidal anti-iflammatory gel (the NSAID piroxicam) with 1g of gel applied three times a day for 4 weeks. The results showed a pain reduction of 16.5 in the arnica gel group versus only 8.1 in the NSAID gel group and the researchers concluded that the Arnica gel was at least as effective and as well tolerated as the NSAID gel. A similar trial involving over 200 people with osteoarthritis of the hands showed that arnica gel was just as effective as an NSAID (ibuprofen) gel in reducing pain and improving hand function.
3. Menthol, Eucalyptus and Mint Oils. Pain relieving creams containing either one or a combination of menthol, camphor, eucalyptus, spearmint, wintergreen or peppermint are thought to work by "confusing" nerve signals into feeling heat and cold sensations instead of pain.  Popular brands include Mentholatum Deep Heating Rub® and Icy Hot® (which may contain methyl salicylate too).  While many pain sufferers say these products work, its' relief is temporary at best.  These pain relief creams have to be reapplied frequently and tend to have strong fragrances.
Hi Patricia, Sorry to hear about your experience. The patient information leaflet for diclofenac gel inside each pack advises that users should avoid applying on large areas of skin, that an amount ranging in size from a 1 penny to a 2 pence piece will usually be sufficient, and not to use it if you are already taking NSAID tablets. High blood pressure is not listed as a possible side effect, as this was not detected in clinical trials. As you say, diclofenac tablets and other oral NSAIDs are now associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease which is why the gel is considered a better option. I have coverd this in a post about ibuprofen increasing blood pressure here. Research looking into the long-term tolerability of topical diclogenac gel in people with an elevated risk of NSAID-related side effects, such as existing high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease, suggests that the gel appears to be safe to use to treat osteoarthritis, even in these high risk groups. Having said that, everyone is different, due to the genes they have inherited, and you may have experienced an unusual, idiosyncratic reaction to the small amounts absorbed via the skin. It’s good that you or your doctor were monitoring your blood pressure to detect this. I have a website dedicated to lowering a high blood pressure, which includes lots of complementary approaches, that you may find helpful. Are you able to share the name of the herbal cream which you have found works better? Best wishes, Sarah B
Direct from the Kalahari Desert comes devil’s claw, a claw-shaped fruit that has been used for centuries by the South African tribes as a natural remedy for inflammation and to treat arthritis pain. Numerous studies carried out on devil’s claw show it to have powerful natural NSAID-like properties. In fact, the journal Phytomedicine reported that it is just as effective as the osteoarthritis medication Diacerein. What’s more, studies carried out in both France and Germany pointed to devil claw’s effects being similar to cortisone.
PharmacyTimes.com [Internet]. Fudin J. Should Topical NSAIDs Have Strict Heart Risk Warnings?; 2018 March 10 [cited 18 Jun 12]. Although this article’s title implies concerns about topical NSAID safety, it ends up answering that concern with very reassuring data, and it turns into a piece suggesting that the FDA needs to make it clearer that only oral NSAIDs are of concern, while topical is an extremely safe alternative! “ … all topical vehicles of diclofenac delivery result in only a small fraction of the diclofenac that actually reaches the systemic circulation compared with the oral route.” BACK TO TEXT
The good news regarding back pain is this: Most cases of lower back pain are believed to be due to “mechanical” problems of the musculoskeletal system rather than serious illness or chronic health problems. Abnormalities, weakness, and added stress placed on the bones, joints, ligaments and muscles can all contribute to back problems. It’s been found that the most common causes of low back pain (there are many!) include: (8)
Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage have several health benefits. They naturally support detox organs like the liver and kidneys, and they contain plenty of natural fiber, folate, and vitamin C. But they can also help to regulate inflammatory bacteria within the digestive tract, especially H. pylori, which is implicated in ulcers and other chronic digestive conditions. (25) Since the body obtains all of its nutrients via digestion, an inflamed digestive system will contribute to inflammation throughout the rest of the body. Eating cruciferous vegetables daily can help to promote the healthy elimination of toxins as well as the proper regulation of the digestive system.
Uncaria tomentosa and Uncaria guianensis are Peruvian herbs derived from woody vines with small claw-like thorns (hence the vernacular name, cat’s claw) at the base of the leaf, which allow the plant to climb to heights of up to 100 ft. Traditionally, the bark of cat’s claw is used to treat arthritis, bursitis, and intestinal disorders. The active ingredients appear to be polyphenols (flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, and tannins), alkaloids, and sterols. Various studies indicate that this Peruvian herb induces a generalized reduction in proinflammatory mediators.

Never use a topical product if you have open wounds, scratches, or broken skin to reduce risks. You don’t want to cover up these with Band-Aids. Never apply near your eyes or mucous membranes, including your private area. Be sure to follow the directions on the product. Using these products for too long can make you skin become sensitive and you might have an allergic reaction. If you use a patch and it starts to itch, burn, or your skin has a rash or is red, stop using it. You can use the product for a long time before your body becomes sensitive to one or more of the ingredients. If you have a reaction, see your healthcare provider at once. This can also happen with lotions, creams, sticks, roll-ons, and gels. Don’t keep adding more to your skin if the product doesn’t seem to work. More is not better.

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS) machines are small, battery-powered devices that transmit low-voltage electrical currents through electrodes that are attached to your skin. Considered very safe, TENS machines, according to one theory, work by scrambling the message of pain to the brain — literally blocking it. Another theory suggests that the electrical impulses cause a release of endorphins that override the sensation of pain. Many back pain patients have had success with TENS machines, though their effectiveness has not been clearly proven in controlled studies. Ask your doctor or physical therapist if this therapy might be right for you.


A type of enzyme extracted from pineapple stems, bromelain reduces levels of prostaglandins, which are hormones that induce inflammation. Bromelain may benefit people with arthritis and conditions associated with musculoskeletal tension (such as TMJ syndrome), as well as those suffering trauma-related inflammation. What's more, the enzyme may promote healing in muscles and connective tissues.
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