If you’re someone who experiences muscle and joint pain from time to time (or on a regular basis), you’ve probably tried quite a few options for pain relief. And you’re probably already using external pain relievers—the kind you apply directly to your skin for fast relief from sore muscles and joints. But have you thought of adding an external pain relief cream to the mix?
It seems to be a goal for those people with chronic pain to spend a day without the pains and aches. They are ready to do anything to manage their pain. These people have tried nearly everything to get relief from pain including extremely addictive and potent prescription drugs, surgery with several dangerous side effects. They also try to herbal, homeopathic, acupuncture and many other remedies. In truth, there are some creams may be dangerous and toxic to your health. Sometimes pain relief cream is not the solution of all pains due to their toxic side effects. So, how do we make sure that the cream we choose is safe?
I am a science writer and a former Registered Massage Therapist with a decade of experience treating tough pain cases. I was the Assistant Editor of ScienceBasedMedicine.org for several years. I’ve written hundreds of articles and several books, and I’m known for readable but heavily referenced analysis, with a touch of sass. I am a runner and ultimate player. • more about me • more about PainScience.com
NSAIDs don’t just damage your gut lining. They affect your gut bacteria, too. A study of regular users found that different NSAIDs caused different changes in gut bacteria.[5] Ibuprofen and arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex), for example, increased pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae, a family of bacteria that includes E. coli, Salmonella, and a number of lesser-known bacteria that contribute to eye, skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections.[6]
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