The advantage of using a topical analgesic is that the medication works locally. Targeting pain more precisely using a medication applied to the skin can help skirt the side effects of oral drugs. This can be a boon for people whose stomachs are sensitive to NSAIDs. (Keep in mind that a small amount of the medicine still enters the bloodstream and ends up in the stomach and elsewhere, so a topical analgesic isn’t a guarantee against NSAID-related stomach irritation.)
Schematic showing that when a cell membrane is injured the arachidonic acid pathway is activated to initiate the local inflammatory response through the production of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. Their activation requires the enzymes COX and LOX. The NSAIDs can block COX action and thereby prevent the formation of the COX-derived inflammatory mediators. 5-HPETE = 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid; LTC4 = leukotriene C4; PGE2 = prostaglandin E2; PGF2 = prostaglandin F2; PGI2 = prostacyclin; TXA2 = thromboxane.
If you find yourself snacking at night before bed, it may be because you're bored or anxious — not truly hungry — and eating makes you feel better. Try eating a healthy dinner a bit later in the evening. If your stomach is truly growling before bed, try a protein-based snack like a hard-boiled egg or a slice of cheese. A few spoonfuls of yogurt or some fruit is another good option. 
Ginger can be eaten raw or pickled, grated or brewed into tea, added as a spice to dishes, or encapsulated. Ginger tea or capsules seem to be the most efficient way to regularly consume it. You can drink up to four cups of tea daily, and capsules should follow daily recommendations or what practitioners suggest. Similar to turmeric, those on blood thinners should consult their doctors before adding daily ginger to their diet.
Omega-3 EFA, found in fish oil, can directly reduce the degenerative enzymes, aggrecanase and matrix metalloproteinase, as well as IL-1, TNF-α, and COX-2, to reduce the inflammation in synovial cartilage. A recent study of 250 patients with cervical and lumbar disc disease, who were taking NSAIDs, revealed that 59% could substitute fish oil supplements as a natural anti-inflammatory agent for the NSAIDs.[71] The recommended dosage is a total of 1.5–5g of EPA and DHA per day, taken with meals.
Can stomach problems cause lower back pain? The back is a sensitive part of the body, which has many nerves and organs nearby. This means that issues such as digestive conditions can occur at the same time as back pain. Back pain and bloating are common symptoms of injury, pregnancy, or gastrointestinal problems. Treatment depends on the cause. Learn more here. Read now
Customers attest to the fact that it relieves pain immediately, and say it’s a good staple to have in your medicine cabinet to treat all kinds of aches and pains beyond arthritis as well. They like that it’s not greasy, doesn’t burn and rubs in easily. Some say it works better than pills because you can apply it directly to the areas that are experiencing pain, and they love that it doesn’t have the medicinal smell of some other pain-relief creams.
I will admit I wasn't a believer. I have torn my knees all up and have had surgery. Surgery fixed the torn meniscus but the pain didn't stop. So I got on the pain pill routine. I hate taking the pills they make me feel fuzzy. A friend recommended Topricin to me. I got some and used it. Within days I noticed I needed less pills. It really does help the pain. I love it IT WORKS! I still have the pills in case it gets really bad but most of the time the pain can be managed by using the cream. I even keep a small tube in my purse just in case I need it. It also helps to show people what I am using. An added benefit is that it doesn't smell.

If your back pain hasn't resolved itself within four to six weeks, you'll want to make an appointment with your doctor. Your doc will examine your back and ask you to sit, stand, bend, walk, and lift your legs to see how your pain is affecting your mobility. You'll likely be asked to rate your pain on a scale of one to 10, and you may be sent for imaging tests like an x-ray or MRI. You might be asked to try one of these therapies:

While leading the most vigorous life filled with project deadlines and domestic responsibilities and accomplishing success at all endeavors do you sometimes get compelled to lag behind other such active individuals given to the muscle pain agony? And does this dilemma affect you at a most recurring frequency at times when you are preparing for an office presentation or venturing out to complete household tasks? Be aware that in order to prevail as a most efficient professional and sincere family person putting forward causes of back pain or calf cramp or wrist soreness as reasons for not fulfilling your duties is the least enterprise that you can undertake.
Hallie Levine is an award-winning magazine and freelance writer who contributes to Consumer Reports on health and fitness topics. Her work has been published in Health, Prevention, Reader's Digest, and Parents, among others. She's a mom to three kids and a fat but feisty black Labrador Retriever named Ivry. In her (nonexistent) spare time, she likes to read, swim, and run marathons.
Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (often abbreviated to NSAIDs) are creams, gels, rubs, solutions or sprays that contain a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent and are designed to be applied directly to the skin overlying a painful joint or area of bone. They are used to relieve pain and to treat symptoms of arthritis such as inflammation, swelling, and stiffness. Topical NSAIDs may also be used in the treatment of actinic keratosis (a precancerous patch of thick, scaly or crusted skin).
Warnings: For external use only. Avoid contact with eyes, mucous membranes, and broken or irritated skin. In case of accidental contact, flush with water. Keep out of the reach of children. If irritation occurs, discontinue use immediately. Do not tightly wrap or bandage or use with other topical preparations or heating pads. Consult a doctor if you are pregnant/nursing, under 12 years old, have sensitive skin, your condition persists or worsens, or excessive burning or irritation persists.

A combination of Boswellia and curcumin showed superior efficacy and tolerability compared with nonsteroidal diclofenac for treating active osteoarthritis. Boswellia typically is given as an extract standardized to contain 30-40% boswellic acids (300-500 mg two or three times/day). Boswellia has been well tolerated in most studies, although some people may experience stomach discomfort, including nausea, acid reflux, or diarrhea.[1–10,42,48,56,62,103,104]
A lot of people who read this are going to want to try it on their low back pain, neck pain, and/or other kinds of muscle pain. Will it work? The only honest answer is, “Who knows?” I have no clinical experience with this yet, and certainly it’s unstudied. It might be worth trying, in moderation, with the full awareness that there’s every possibility that it could be a waste of time and money.
One of the products I like mixes bromelain, curcumin, and quercetin. This powerful trio provides enhanced support for maintaining a healthy inflammatory response to reduce pain. Another favorite is a blend that contains essential nutrients the body needs to repair and recover, along with potent herbal pain alleviators, including black cohosh, white willow bark, valerian, and devil’s claw. Lastly, I suggest a high-potency proteolytic enzyme product combined with rutin. This supports the body’s natural processes for tissue and joint recovery. The enzymes work synergistically with rutin to naturally boost muscle and tissue repair.
7. White Willow Bark (Salix alba) –  The active ingredient in white willow is salicin, which the body converts into salicylic acid. This tree’s covering lowers the body’s levels of prostaglandins, hormone-like compounds that can cause aches, pain, and inflammation. What’s more, white willow bark doesn’t upset the stomach or cause internal bleeding like many over-the-counter aspirins. Turn to this herb for relief from menstrual cramps, muscle pains, arthritis, or after knee or hip surgery as it promotes blood flow and reduces swelling.
An ayurvedic spice known to tame arthritis pain, the curry spice turmeric contains an antioxidant compound called curcumin. In an animal-based study published in 2007, scientists discovered that curcumin can overpower pro-inflammatory proteins called cytokines. The compound may also help decrease pain associated with autoimmune disorders and tendonitis.
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