The first generic (cheaper) equivalent of Voltaren® Gel entered the marketplace in 2016, produced by Amneal Pharmaceutical. It should be widely available now. Both products are still prescription-only in the US, but fortunately they are over-the-counter almost everywhere else (there’s a rack of tubes of Voltaren by the till at my neighbhourhood drugstore).
If you have an attack of lower-back pain that is severe, continuous and not improving, assessment and treatment by a health care professional who focuses on the back or other musculoskeletal problems may help. These practitioners may use both active and passive techniques to help you feel better. Examples of passive techniques that may be used to get you moving include:
It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.
Plant- and animal-derived nutraceutical preparations have been used for hundreds and even thousands of years to obtain effective pain relief. Herbal medications are becoming increasingly popular because of their relatively few side effects. Nevertheless, there are problems associated with these dietary supplements, and their use requires knowledge of their biological action, clinical studies (both affirmative and negative), and potential interactions with other nutraceutical products and prescription medications.
It contains arnica, a wonderful pain reliever used by many massage therapists, vitamin B6 that makes red blood cells that produces neurotransmitters, homocysteine levels, and also makes the hormones serotonin and norepinephrine; it has pyridoxine; choline bitartrate cetyl myristoleate; MSM (methylsulfonlmethane) that helps with scars, stretch marks, and pain; and has glucosamine, and boswellia serrata.
Ensure that the type of anti-inflammatory cream you buy for yourself, a friend, or family member is of the right quality and more efficient in helping you deal with your health predicaments. The best quality brands would be fast acting and gentle to your skin with every application. Most of all, the cream that you choose at any given point in time should not have any side effects otherwise you would be exposing yourself to the ordeal of tackling what would result from using the poor quality creams in hopes of dealing with a minor injury. The best cream would take the shortest period to help relieve you of any kind of pain or inflammation so that you would comfortably carry on with whatever you might be doing.
The only side effect most of these products have is odor. Some of them were reviewed as being neutral to actually smelling good, while others were reported to have quite a strong smell you might not like. A lot of this has to do with the nature of the ingredients in pain relieving treatments. Mentholated ingredients give natural relief, but they do tend to have a strong odor that accompanies them.

The good news is that myofascial release is also something we can do for ourselves! A recent study showed that a regular program of self-myofascial release lowered pain intensity and lessened stiffness. To start, you can simply lie on the floor and place a small, soft ball (around the size and density of a large orange) under any tight and painful muscle areas. Then allow your body to sink onto and around the ball for a few minutes to provide the right amount of sustained pressure to allow the fascia to release. Learn how to self-myofascial release with this Myofascial Self Care Video Course that was developed by a pair of myofascial release therapists, and is is a great way to do MFR treatment at home.


Gentle stretches, walking, and periodically standing up at your desk can help stabilize your spine and prevent muscle imbalances. And despite how hard it is to imagine doing Downward-Facing Dog with a bad back, yoga can work in your favor, too. A 2013 review of studies found strong evidence it can help beat lower back pain. Any type works; one to consider is the restorative viniyoga style.
Jackson, M., & Tummon Simmons, L. (2018, April 1). Challenging case in clinical practice: Improvement in chronic osteoarthritis pain with use of arnica oil massage, therapeutic ultrasound, and acupuncture — A case report [Abstract]. Alternative and Complementary Therapies, 24(2), 60–62. Retrieved from https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/act.2018.29152.mja?journalCode=act

The most commonly used drugs to treat chronic pain conditions include opioids (morphine), nonsteroids (salicylates such as aspirin and ibuprofen), antidepressants, antiepileptics and anti-nerve growth factor inhibitors.   All of these drugs have awful side effects and addictive tendencies.  In fact, prescription and over the counter pain medications are the fastest growing drug addiction in North America (1).
Burdock root is a natural botanical for that is in wide use for many conditions, among them arthritic pain, swollen joints and rheumatism. More than anything else, clinical studies have found it most effective as a blood purifier that helps to rid the body of deleterious toxins and clear congestion from the circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory and urinary systems. Burdock is said to cleanse and eliminate long-term impurities from the blood very rapidly through its action on both the liver and kidneys. For those who suffer from arthritis and have taken too much Tylenol, burdock root has been clinical proven to protect the liver cells from the damage of taking acetaminophen. It is believed to stimulate the gallbladder and encourage liver cells to regenerate.
7. White Willow Bark (Salix alba) –  The active ingredient in white willow is salicin, which the body converts into salicylic acid. This tree’s covering lowers the body’s levels of prostaglandins, hormone-like compounds that can cause aches, pain, and inflammation. What’s more, white willow bark doesn’t upset the stomach or cause internal bleeding like many over-the-counter aspirins. Turn to this herb for relief from menstrual cramps, muscle pains, arthritis, or after knee or hip surgery as it promotes blood flow and reduces swelling.
A combination of Boswellia and curcumin showed superior efficacy and tolerability compared with nonsteroidal diclofenac for treating active osteoarthritis. Boswellia typically is given as an extract standardized to contain 30-40% boswellic acids (300-500 mg two or three times/day). Boswellia has been well tolerated in most studies, although some people may experience stomach discomfort, including nausea, acid reflux, or diarrhea.[1–10,42,48,56,62,103,104]
In a 2011 research review published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia, investigators looked at the available research on the use of topically applied capsaicin in the treatment of several types of chronic pain. This included two clinical trials examining back pain, both of which found that capsaicin helped reduce low back pain without causing notable side effects.
Arnica is a natural anti-inflammatory, which is why you’ll find it in many pain relief gels and creams. It is a powerful natural medicine that comes from the perennial flower Arnica Montana. It that makes natural quick and easy pain relief possible, and it is also one of the biggest reasons why most pain relief gels and creams that use Arnica are available over the counter without a prescription or a doctor’s visit.

Finally, the active ingredients within a pain relief cream interact with local nerve endings to damp down inflammation, reduce pain and swelling and ease stiffness. All these different actions make topical, rub-in creams and gels highly effective for treating painful joints, sore muscles and sport injuries. Here, I’ve reviewed what I believe are the best pain relief creams, sore muscle creams and pain relief gels.
There is a large amount of natural products on the market with anti-inflammatory properties which contain arnica, such as sports massage creams combining arnica and other natural plant extracts (devil’s claw, calendula, St John’s wort and peppermint oil, among others, as well as PHYSIORELAX FORTE PLUS cream) for symptomatic relief of joint and muscle pain. However, we must be well informed about the quality and origin of the extracts used in any creams, gels and ointments purchased at pharmacies, herbal shops and specialised phytotherapy shops, so that we use the best quality product possible.

While these are not the only risks NSAID medications, they are somewhat more common, and some of the more worrisome, side effects. It is always safest to have a discussion with your physician if you have any concerns about the risk of taking these medications. It is important to understand that even in healthy people without underlying medical conditions, there is always the risk associated with any medication. The benefits of taking an anti-inflammatory medication need to be balanced with the possible risks of taking the medication.
One of the products I like mixes bromelain, curcumin, and quercetin. This powerful trio provides enhanced support for maintaining a healthy inflammatory response to reduce pain. Another favorite is a blend that contains essential nutrients the body needs to repair and recover, along with potent herbal pain alleviators, including black cohosh, white willow bark, valerian, and devil’s claw. Lastly, I suggest a high-potency proteolytic enzyme product combined with rutin. This supports the body’s natural processes for tissue and joint recovery. The enzymes work synergistically with rutin to naturally boost muscle and tissue repair.

Ingredients:Active ingredients (in cream): Belladonna 3X, Capsicum 3X, Colocynthis 3X, Gnaphalium Polycephalum 3X, Hypericum Perforatum 3X, Magnesia Phosphorica 3X, Rhus Tox 3X. Inactive ingredients Water, Polyacrylamide, C13-14 Isoparaffin, Propylene Glycol, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Capsicum Annuum Resin, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Oil, Laureth-7, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Folic Acid, Retinyl Palmitate, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract, Achillea Millefolium Extract, Sambucus Nigra Flower Extract, Foeniculum Vulgare (Fennel) Seed Extract, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Flower Extract, Rosa Canina Flower Extract, Ger anium Maculatum Extract.


Yes, most of these creams can either be used on a daily basis or long-term basis. Nevertheless, at any given point in time, always ensure that you consult with your doctor to find out how often it would be advisable to use such forms of medication. The best quality ones are the ones that would be FDA approved and natural. Therefore, you should use these types of medication for as long as the health practitioners advise.
Injections. If other measures don't relieve your pain, and if your pain radiates down your leg, your doctor may inject cortisone — an anti-inflammatory medication — or numbing medication into the space around your spinal cord (epidural space). A cortisone injection helps decrease inflammation around the nerve roots, but the pain relief usually lasts less than a few months.
Too much tension and tightness can cause back pain. "Our goal in increasing flexibility is to put an equal load throughout the body from the feet all the way up to the head,” Davis says. “One good exercise is to sit on the edge of the bed with one leg extended and the other one on the floor. Give your hamstrings a stretch by leaning forward while keeping your back in a neutral position.”

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Physical therapists often recommend aquatic therapy — including exercises done in warm, therapeutic pools — for back pain. The buoyancy of the water helps alleviate strain on the joints to encourage strengthening and gentle stretching of the muscles. Even floating in warm water can help relax muscles and release tension as well as increase circulation, according to the Arthritis Foundation. With home whirlpool baths, try aiming the jets directly at your sore spots for a soothing underwater massage.
After you apply diclofenac gel (Voltaren) or liquid (Pennsaid), you should not cover the treated area with any type of dressing or bandage and you should not apply heat to the area. You should not shower or bathe for at least 30 minutes after you apply the liquid (Pennsaid) and for at least 1 hour after you apply the gel (Voltaren). Do not cover the treated area with clothes or gloves for 10 minutes after you apply the gel (Voltaren), or until the liquid (Pennsaid) has dried if you are using the liquid.
Achy back? You're not alone: back problems send more Americans to the doctor annually than nearly any other medical problem, according to a 2013 Mayo Clinic study. Whether you're recovering from misjudging a heavy load (we've all been there), dealing with a lingering injury, or have a chronic problem, you don't necessarily need to resort to popping tons of pain relievers. Talk to your doc about these 15 expert-approved natural back pain remedies, and find out if they are safe and appropriate for you.
When people experience a minor headache, muscle tension or other pain, they readily reach for over-the-counter drugs like ibuprofen and acetaminophen—the most commonly used drugs in the U.S. But regular use of these drugs can lead to long-term side effects like intestinal damage, liver failure and more, recent research reveals. Before popping the pills, consider these alternative remedies for natural pain relief.
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