I am allergic to anti-inflammatory pills since they affect my stomach. I don't like the bad side effects they give either. So I look to topical anti-inflammatory cream to help when I have back, hip and/or shoulders sprains and strains. I have tried endless products: Penetrex, Aspercreme, Australian dream, Celadrin and so on. Out of these, Muscle Care works best for pain management. However, I do have some skin reactions to it so I have to give it a rest. When that happens, I use Topricin which works quite well. However, to me, SynthaFlex works as well, if not better. On top of that, it gives a strong cool menthol effect which Topricin doesn't. So when I overwork some muscles, I like to use SynthaFlex and/or Topricin. When my skin reactions calm down, I go back to using Muscle Care from time to time. I also use a roller to stretch which also helps. I hope this review gives others a better sense of what might work for them.
Laugh more often. One study showed that social laughter actually increases pain tolerance.5 Laughing along with others was shown to have the highest positive impact. Laughter has many positive effects, including increasing circulation and oxygen, and raising your body's level of endorphins (the body's natural pain killers). There is a whole movement called "laughter yoga"—which helps people enjoy the many benefits of laughter without having to need a reason to laugh—it just focuses on laughing for its own sake.

Dealing with back pain is frustrating to say the least. Aches and stiffness can keep you from enjoying your favorite activities. But you can change that with pain relief cream for back pain. From cooling menthol gels to odorless creams that target inflammation, there are plenty of options to address even the most pressing back problems. You can’t go wrong with any of the creams on this list, so choose your favorite and forget the back pain.
Some manufacturers inflate nutraceutical products’ claims and may not cite possible side effects and potential drug interactions. Bleeding complications are associated with white willow bark, ginger, garlic, and others. Therefore, such medicinal preparations are not without risk. Products such as omega-3 essential fatty acids (EFAs) (O3) do have strong scientific support to be considered as an alternative and/or complementary agent to NSAIDs. Published studies have shown the effectiveness of O3 to successfully treat spine-related pain.[71] Capsaicin, oil of camphor, and other natural topical preparations are commonly used for muscle soreness and local application for painful traumatic injuries.[12,16,80] The subsequent sections will review many of these products and discuss both their efficacy and safety issues. As with any drug or natural compounds, additional caution should be used when considering these treatments for children, pregnant or lactating mothers or any other clinical or disease condition that could increase possible risk of side effect or complication.
Author Bio: Ginevra Liptan, MD, developed fibromyalgia while in medical school. She is a graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine and board-certified in internal medicine. Dr. Liptan is the founder and medical director of The Frida Center for Fibromyalgia and the author of The FibroManual: A Complete Fibromyalgia Treatment Guide For You...And Your Doctor and The Fibro Food Formula: A Real-Life Approach to Fibromyalgia Relief.

you should know that you should not apply sunscreens, cosmetics, lotions, moisturizers, insect repellents, or other topical medications to areas treated with diclofenac gel (Voltaren). If you have been prescribed diclofenac liquid (Pennsaid), wait until the area of application is completely dry before applying any of these products or other substances.


NSAIDs don’t just damage your gut lining. They affect your gut bacteria, too. A study of regular users found that different NSAIDs caused different changes in gut bacteria.[5] Ibuprofen and arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex), for example, increased pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae, a family of bacteria that includes E. coli, Salmonella, and a number of lesser-known bacteria that contribute to eye, skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections.[6]
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