Traditional wisdom says that NSAID pain relievers only damage your gut lining if you take them every day for a long time, but recent research disagrees. High-level athletes with stress-related intestinal damage tried taking ibuprofen to improve muscle soreness and recovery. Ibuprofen ended up damaging their gut lining even further after just a couple weeks; it increased inflammation and made their original pain issues worse.[3] In fact, a single dose of aspirin can significantly increase your intestinal permeability.[4]
In October 2007, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (Voltaren Gel) became the first topical NSAID for OA therapy approved in the United States following a long history of use internationally. Topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel delivers effective diclofenac concentrations in the affected joint with limited systemic exposure. Clinical trial data suggest that diclofenac sodium 1% gel provides clinically meaningful analgesia in OA patients with a low incidence of systemic AEs.
Cold and heat therapies. It's best to use cold compresses or an ice pack, not heat, immediately following a back injury, since this can alleviate pain by numbing the area and prevent or reduce swelling. About 48 hours after the onset of back pain, though, applying heating pads or a hot-water bottle to your back may be helpful. The warmth soothes and relaxes aching muscles and increases blood flow, which helps the healing process. Keep in mind that heat therapy is only helpful for the first week.
Looking for a nonaddictive way to soothe aches? LifeSeasons’ award-winning Pain Bloc-R helps deliver the benefits of conventional approaches, including decreased aches and discomforts and increased relaxation, without the common pharmaceutical side effects. Pain Bloc-R combines natural ingredients and compounds, including Angelica dahurica, white willow bark, L-tetrahydropalmatine, and L-theanine, that work together to help support the body’s natural ability to relieve everyday aches.
Collagen—particularly Type II collagen—is the main structural building block of joint cartilage. The human body is made up of 60 percent Type II collagen, and Hydrolyzed Type II collagen contains the amino acids found in human cartilage. Your body uses these amino acids to create new collagen—and repair your cartilage and connective tissue throughout your body. Hydrolyzed Collagen Type II also contains Hyaluronic Acid, which lubricates your joints and makes it an effective natural remedy for inflammation.
The Biofreeze® pain relief gel is available in 16-, 32-, or 128-ounce bottles and is offered as the colorless or original green formula. The company has been making pain relief products for over 25 years. It is the #1 product that has been clinically used by professional healthcare hands-on providers, massage therapists, physical therapists, chiropractors, foot doctors (podiatrists), athletic coaches, instructors, and trainers. This is considered the best pain relief cream for muscle pain perfect for athletes. When professionals have over a hundred clients each week, the economical 128-ounce jug might be best for you for not running out. You always want it on hand for clients with sore aching body parts.

While most people are only looking to relieve the immediate symptoms of the pain, this will only provide temporary relief.  Addressing the underlying mental/emotional, chemical and physical stressors that are causing the chronic inflammation and pain is the ultimate goal.  This process takes time and deep introspection along with trusted holistic health care providers.

This product treats various types of pain. It’s great for stiffness, bruises, and sprains, and it may be the best pain relief cream for back pain. It’s not smelly, and it relieves pain associated with cramps. This cream rubs into the skin quickly, making it ideal for those who are irritated by aches and pains throughout the day. Carry this pain relief cream in your purse or bag to use as needed.


The good news regarding back pain is this: Most cases of lower back pain are believed to be due to “mechanical” problems of the musculoskeletal system rather than serious illness or chronic health problems. Abnormalities, weakness, and added stress placed on the bones, joints, ligaments and muscles can all contribute to back problems. It’s been found that the most common causes of low back pain (there are many!) include: (8)
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Hi Brenda, The most effective painkilling gel is Voltarol which contains diclofenac, assuming your bad reaction to oral painkillers was not an allergy to NSAIDs. Another option to try is magnetic gloves, or a pain killing device such as Arc4Health, which can have quite miraculous painkilling effects. You should also ask your doctor to refer you to a pain clinic for specialist advice. I hope that helps. Best wishes, Sarah B

Foam roller exercises are a form of self-myofascial release that, while kind of mildly painful at times, actually gets out those nagging muscle knots while helping you fix muscle imbalances that lead to poor posture and related musculoskeletal pain. It’s also an emerging treatment to reduce your risk of developing delayed muscle onset soreness, a common exercise-related pain that keeps people out of the gym. (6)
QUORA EXPERT - TOP WRITER 2018 Dr Sarah Brewer MSc (Nutr Med), MA (Cantab), MB, BChir, RNutr, MBANT, CNHC qualified from Cambridge University with degrees in Natural Sciences, Medicine and Surgery. After working in general practice, she gained a master's degree in nutritional medicine from the University of Surrey. Sarah is a registered Medical Doctor, a registered Nutritionist and a registered Nutritional Therapist. She is an award winning author of over 60 popular self-help books and a columnist for Prima magazine.
Aquatic therapy is essentially physical therapy in a pool. Instead of using weights for resistance, patients use the resistance of the water. Studies show it may help alleviate lower back pain. In one 2013 study, sedentary adults who underwent aquatic therapy five times a week for two months saw reductions in pain and increases in quality of life. One smaller study found that aquatic therapy also helped pregnant women who were experiencing aching lower backs.
If you’re sensitive to aspirin, or if you’re taking any over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs (like aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen), you should avoid willow bark. You should also avoid taking it if you’re taking warfarin (Coumadin) or other anticoagulant treatments, as salicin could increase the risk of bleeding. Talk to your doctor before taking willow bark if you’re taking other anti-inflammatory or pain medications.
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