A physical therapist will teach you stretches to manage your back pain, as well as exercises to correct any imbalances that might have brought on pain in the first place. Depending on the causes and severity of your back pain, your PT may also employ other treatment techniques, such as ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and active release therapy.
“I was first introduced to Relief by my Chiropractor after I pulled a muscle. Later my son, while playing hockey, received a very nasty hit during a game and was given Biofreeze as part of his recovery process. I can tell you Relief is 10x better—he was still in pain after using the Biofreeze, so I grabbed the Relief and he could not believe the difference. Now we are a Relief ONLY household. I am spreading the word to all the other hockey mom’s on the quality of your product and how well it works. Thank you for creating Relief and keep up the good work.” *
After you apply diclofenac gel (Voltaren) or liquid (Pennsaid), you should not cover the treated area with any type of dressing or bandage and you should not apply heat to the area. You should not shower or bathe for at least 30 minutes after you apply the liquid (Pennsaid) and for at least 1 hour after you apply the gel (Voltaren). Do not cover the treated area with clothes or gloves for 10 minutes after you apply the gel (Voltaren), or until the liquid (Pennsaid) has dried if you are using the liquid.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have shown efficacy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) pain but are also associated with a dose-dependent risk of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematologic, hepatic, and renal adverse events (AEs). Topical NSAIDs were developed to provide analgesia similar to their oral counterparts with less systemic exposure and fewer serious AEs. Topical NSAIDs have long been available in Europe for the management of OA, and guidelines of the European League Against Rheumatism and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International specify that topical NSAIDs are preferred over oral NSAIDs for patients with knee or hand OA of mild-to-moderate severity, few affected joints, and/or a history of sensitivity to oral NSAIDs.
Hi Carol, Sorry to hear you are in such pain. Hopefully the results of the x-ray will show a way forward to solve the problem. You may benefit from physiotherapy to prevent frozen shoulder, or gentle chiropractic manipulation to correct misalignments of tiny joints – this certainly helped my other half who experienced a similar problem. A topical treatment containing capsaicin may help by damping down nerve generated pain. Magnetic therapy and using a heatlamp are other non-drug approaches which have been shown to improve circulation and boost healing of shoulder problems. Anti-inflammatories such as omega-3, turmeric or rosehip are other options. I hope you feel more comfortable soon. Best wishes, Sarah B

In October 2007, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (Voltaren Gel) became the first topical NSAID for OA therapy approved in the United States following a long history of use internationally. Topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel delivers effective diclofenac concentrations in the affected joint with limited systemic exposure. Clinical trial data suggest that diclofenac sodium 1% gel provides clinically meaningful analgesia in OA patients with a low incidence of systemic AEs.
Pain is a leading cause of insomnia—difficulty with falling asleep and/or staying asleep. Approximately two-thirds of people with chronic back pain suffer from some type of sleep disorder. Paradoxically, inadequate sleep can make your back pain worse. This vicious cycle makes it ineffective to treat just the pain. If you have sleep problems, you need to get the sleep problems addressed too.
Back in the “olden days,” our ancestors didn’t like to waste any part of an animal they were using for food. Because of that, back then, bone broth was a normal part of almost everyone’s diet. Made of bones, marrow, skin, feet, tendons and ligaments, this old-fashioned stock helped provide an ample dose of collagen, proline, glycine and glutamine that is largely missing from the modern American diet.
Within the cartilage around your joints is a chemical known as chondroitin. Chondroitin is naturally produced by the body. As you age, your natural supply starts to plummet. And a loss of chondroitin from cartilage is linked to a major cause of joint pain. Moreover, through wear and tear the joint cartilage breaks down, resulting in the condition of Osteoarthritis. We can’t regenerate cartilage on our own, but we can take a supplement called chondroitin sulfate which, studies show, can help slow down this degenerative process and help naturally reduce arthritic pain. Chondroitin sulfate is made from the cartilage of cows and other animals, and is often used in combination with other products including glucosamine and manganese.
Staying in bed for any prolonged period can make you stiff and increase pain. When you don’t move and bend, you lose muscle strength and flexibility. With bed rest, you lose about 1 percent of your muscle strength each day. And you can lose 20 to 30 percent in a week. It becomes more difficult to return to any activity. As you become weaker and stiffer your recovery takes longer.
Get enough restorative sleep. Getting enough sleep is critical to managing pain and promoting healing, so it's important to employ a variety of sleep aids to help you get a healthy amount of sleep. Regular exercise that physically exhausts the body helps promote deep sleep. Visualization, meditation, and other psychological techniques can also help you get to sleep and stay asleep.
People with sensitive skin, infants, children, pregnant women, and seniors might be at a higher use using these products. People with kidney problems or kidney failure in the past shouldn’t try an Ibuprofen cream. If you take aspirin, prescribed blood thinners such as Coumadin (warfarin) or have bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract, consult your healthcare provider before using these topical pain products. Do not use salicylates that cause blood to be thinner.

In the case of topical creams, many individuals may suffer from allergies that they weren't even aware of until they encounter a negative reaction. These reactions can range in severity from mild skin irritation to more severe issues such as inflammation and increased pain. Remember to check all the ingredients for any topical medication you buy in order to avoid potential allergens and irritants.

Resveratrol is a plant-based polyphenol molecule that is found in various concentrations of many different plant sources. The plant is called Japanese Knot weed or Polygonum cuspidatum, and the skins of red wine grapes are believe to have the most concentrated amounts of resveratrol. In plants, resveratrol is generally found in the plant skin and acts as a phytoalexin to protect the plant from infection, excessive UV radiation and aide in general plant defense. Resveratrol has also been found to have significant anti-mutation, anti-inflammatory, antoxidant and DNA protective actions, when consumed by animals and humans.
For those sore muscles and inflammation, peppermint oil and pine will relieve your aches and the chamomile and eucalyptus relieve tender feeling pain. For relieving the stress you are feeling, pink grapefruit, lemongrass, and spearmint oil will do that for you. These are all natural products providing you with vitamins A and C and antioxidants with the aloe vera providing moisture to your skin.

The power of Luminas pain patches on pain and inflammation has successfully been measured with the help of thermography technology. When inflammation occurs, blood flow is increased in that area, causing the temperatures to rise. This is identifiable on our infrared cameras. Once a Luminas pain patch is applied to the area, you can see it working right away. In as little as 15 minutes, most of the inflammation and pain had disappeared.
If you suffer from arthritis or other types of pain, you're probably all too familiar with drugs such as aspirin, Aleve, and Naproxen. All belong to a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and all can be purchased without a prescription. But there is another related drug, available by prescription, you might want to talk with your doctor about: diclofenac, available as a gel, patch, or drop that you apply directly to your skin.
How it works: When back muscles hurt, the pain is usually caused by inflamed tissue. Cold reduces the swelling and discomfort, says Jason Highsmith, a neurosurgeon in Charleston, South Carolina. As soon as you feel pain, apply cold several times a day, 10 minutes at a time, for about three days. A bag of frozen peas works, or try a cold pack, like an Ace Reusable Cold Compress ($10 at drugstores).
Products that create a feeling of heat on the skin can also help relieve discomfort by distracting you from pain signals. The Sombra Warm Therapy Natural Pain Relieving Gel provides controlled warming to ease conditions like arthritis, bursitis, fibromyalgia, or even a simple backache. The gel quickly absorbs into the skin and won’t stain clothing. It’s also free of artificial colors, fragrances or alcohol.

The most common cause of anemia is not getting enough iron in your diet but luckily, iron deficiencies are treatable. With an iron supplement for anemia, you can build your body’s iron levels and raise its red blood cell production over time. Not only can it relieve short-term symptoms like dizziness or lethargy, but the right iron supplement can treat anemia and prevent your body from developing it in the future.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are one of the most commonly used types of medications for musculoskeletal conditions. NSAIDs can be effective for a wide variety of orthopedic conditions from arthritis, tendinitis, or other inflammatory conditions. Determining the best NSAID for your condition may depend on a number of different factors, and what works well for one individual may not be the best medication for another. There are possible side effects of different NSAID medications the patient should be aware of, and you should discuss with your physician if taking these medications for more than a short period of time.
If you’re sensitive to aspirin, or if you’re taking any over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs (like aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen), you should avoid willow bark. You should also avoid taking it if you’re taking warfarin (Coumadin) or other anticoagulant treatments, as salicin could increase the risk of bleeding. Talk to your doctor before taking willow bark if you’re taking other anti-inflammatory or pain medications.
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