Still an excellent product. It remains effective for pain relief for about 5 hours with each application for me. Make sure to rub in a good thick portion for several minutes to the entire area of pain. Each jar of Synthaflex lasts about 18 days for me with applications twice each day. It remains the best external joint and muscle pain relief rub that I have ever used.
11. Aquamin – Derived from red seaweed, aquamin is a powerful pain reducer, too. In a study published in Nutrition Journal, of 70 volunteers, Aquamin users reduced arthritis pain by 20% in a month and had less stiffness than patients taking a placebo. Helping to diminish inflammation and helps to build bone, aquamin is rich in both calcium and magnesium, too.
Zeng C, Wei J, Persson MS, et al. Relative efficacy and safety of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for osteoarthritis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies. Br J Sports Med. 2018 Feb. PubMed #29436380. “Topical NSAIDs were effective and safe for OA. Diclofenac patches may be the most effective topical NSAID for pain relief. No serious gastrointestinal and renal AEs were observed in trials or the general population.” BACK TO TEXT

Hi Carol, Sorry to hear you are in such pain. Hopefully the results of the x-ray will show a way forward to solve the problem. You may benefit from physiotherapy to prevent frozen shoulder, or gentle chiropractic manipulation to correct misalignments of tiny joints – this certainly helped my other half who experienced a similar problem. A topical treatment containing capsaicin may help by damping down nerve generated pain. Magnetic therapy and using a heatlamp are other non-drug approaches which have been shown to improve circulation and boost healing of shoulder problems. Anti-inflammatories such as omega-3, turmeric or rosehip are other options. I hope you feel more comfortable soon. Best wishes, Sarah B
Jackson, M., & Tummon Simmons, L. (2018, April 1). Challenging case in clinical practice: Improvement in chronic osteoarthritis pain with use of arnica oil massage, therapeutic ultrasound, and acupuncture — A case report [Abstract]. Alternative and Complementary Therapies, 24(2), 60–62. Retrieved from https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/act.2018.29152.mja?journalCode=act
Authors of a 2016 review published in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism conclude, “Topical NSAIDs have a moderate effect on pain relief, with efficacy similar to that of oral NSAIDs, with the advantage of a better risk:benefit ratio.” However, A 2016 Cochrane review looked at 39 studies with 10,631 participants and found that topical diclofenac, “can provide good levels of pain relief in osteoarthritis, but only for about 10% more people than get this result with topical placebo.”
Cool it off. To do a 10-minute ice massage, fill up small paper or foam cups about one third full and freeze them. When ready to use, peel away the top of the cup to expose the ice and gently slide over the painful area. Try to avoid the bony parts of the joint, such as the knee cap and elbow points. Cover the affected area with a plastic wrap before applying the ice to protect the skin, and place a towel underneath to pick up the moisture as the ice melts. You can also use ice cubes wrapped in plastic for smaller areas. Cold packs and wraps applied for 15 to 30 minutes may also relieve sore lower back or shoulders.
Could you find pain relief through a method that focuses on soft tissue manipulation and your psyche? The answer is yes. Rolfing, also known as structural integration, involves soft tissue work and movement education to realign your body’s myofascial structure with gravity. (8) (Think of your body’s fascia as the “netting” that encases your muscles and organs.)
I use my Rogue Fitness Supernova ($40; roguefitness.com) for self-myofascial release (SMR). By applying pressure directly to sore muscles with my supernova, I am able to roll out knots (or adhesions) on the muscle. This allows the body to bring blood flow to troubled areas by transporting nutrients and oxygen to the muscles for faster repair." — Troy Brooks, YG Studios and founder TB Elite Fitness
Back pain is one of the most common reasons why people visit a health care provider. The good news is that the pain often goes away on its own, and people usually recover in a week or two. Many people want to stay in bed when their back hurts. For many years, getting bed rest was the normal advice. But current studies recommend no bed rest at all and stress that staying in bed longer than 48 hours not only won’t help but it may, in fact, actually delay your recovery. Here’s why:
Massage. Various forms of body work can provide temporary pain relief. You can try full-body Swedish massage for  stress relief and relaxation; deep-tissue massage, which uses pressure and slow strokes on deeper muscle tissue to release knots and relieve tension; or myofascial release, which uses long, stretching strokes to relieve tension around the connective tissue of the muscles.
Collagen—particularly Type II collagen—is the main structural building block of joint cartilage. The human body is made up of 60 percent Type II collagen, and Hydrolyzed Type II collagen contains the amino acids found in human cartilage. Your body uses these amino acids to create new collagen—and repair your cartilage and connective tissue throughout your body. Hydrolyzed Collagen Type II also contains Hyaluronic Acid, which lubricates your joints and makes it an effective natural remedy for inflammation.
Over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve), might relieve acute back pain. Take these medications only as directed by your doctor. Overuse can cause serious side effects. If OTC pain relievers don't relieve your pain, your doctor might suggest prescription NSAIDs.
Even as you practice patience, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) or naproxen (Aleve) can help ease the pain you're pushing through. The research behind medicine guidelines for lower back pain finds that these may give slightly better relief than acetaminophen (Tylenol). Over long periods, NSAIDs can cause gastrointestinal problems, so don't take them for more than 10 days without consulting your doctor.
Authors of a 2016 review published in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism conclude, “Topical NSAIDs have a moderate effect on pain relief, with efficacy similar to that of oral NSAIDs, with the advantage of a better risk:benefit ratio.” However, A 2016 Cochrane review looked at 39 studies with 10,631 participants and found that topical diclofenac, “can provide good levels of pain relief in osteoarthritis, but only for about 10% more people than get this result with topical placebo.”
Anti-inflammatory painkillers are a group of medicines that are used to ease muscle pains, sprains, strains and arthritis. They can be taken by mouth (tablets, capsules or liquids), injected, or applied to the skin. When they are applied to the skin they are called topical anti-inflammatory painkillers. Sometimes they are called 'topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs' (NSAIDs), or just 'topical anti-inflammatories'.
One of the problems with pain relief creams is that application can become messy. It can be difficult to keep the cream contained to the area of skin that needs treating, and if you get the product on your hands, it’s easy to accidentally rub it into the eyes, which can be painful! To the rescue: Roll-on formulas, like Outback All-Natural Pain Relief, which allow for hands-free and targeted pain relief. The product contains just four ingredients: tea tree oil, vanilla, eucalyptus, and olive oil. The ingredients ease pain by reducing inflammation.
Homeopathic (diluted) herbal ointments featuring Arnica are claimed to be good medicine for muscle pain, joint pain, sports injuries and bruises, but their effectiveness is questionable. Known to most customers as an “herbal” arnica cream, most actually contain only trace amounts — too little to be a chemically active ingredient. Homeopathy involves extreme dilution of ingredients, to the point of completely removing them. Some other herbal ingredients may be less diluted and more useful. However, neither homeopathic or pure herbal creams of this type have produced results better than placebo in good quality modern tests. See Does Arnica Gel Work for Pain? A detailed review of popular homeopathic (diluted) herbal creams and gels like Traumeel, used for muscle pain, joint pain, sports injuries, bruising, and post-surgical inflammation. BACK TO TEXT

Different creams and gels combine different pain-relieving ingredients for a greater, synergistic effect. The most effective natural ingredients are arnica, cannabidiol CBD oil, glucosamine, chondroitin, celadrin, comfrey root, capsicum, MSM and Green-lipped mussel extracts. The most effective pharmaceutical pain relief gel are those containing diclofenac, which is a stronger version of ibuprofen.
1. Capsaicin. Capsaicin creams and gels are made from chili peppers.  They cause a mild to moderate burning sensation thought to alter nerves' ability to interpret pain by lowering the presence of a neurotransmitter called Substance P. Brand names including Capzasin and Zostrix are marketed for arthritis, backache, and other joint and muscle pains.  These creams aren't generally associated with any adverse side effects though some patients may feel the heat more intensely than others.

The first is that inflammation-lowering NSAIDs destroy your gut lining. Check the bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin in your medicine cabinet. You’ll see it right on the label: “NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach and/or intestine.”[1] Long-term low-dose aspirin use is particularly likely to cause ulcers and tear holes in your intestine.[2]
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