A lot of people who read this are going to want to try it on their low back pain, neck pain, and/or other kinds of muscle pain. Will it work? The only honest answer is, “Who knows?” I have no clinical experience with this yet, and certainly it’s unstudied. It might be worth trying, in moderation, with the full awareness that there’s every possibility that it could be a waste of time and money.

We looked at both gels and creams to create our top ten list. How did we evaluate consistency? We looked at whether the substances stained, went on greasy, or were otherwise messy to deal with. Did users like the feel of the gel or cream on their skin? Why or why not? We also looked at whether formulas were quick drying and whether they left a residue. When it came to ingredients, we wanted to select as many options as possible with natural ingredients that were easily recognizable.
If you are using a topical anti-inflammatory there is a risk that your skin can become sensitive to light (photosensitivity). If you are using a preparation that contains ketoprofen you should cover the area of skin where ketoprofen has been applied (to protect it from sunlight). Also, you should not use a sunbed, or expose your skin to sunlight during treatment, and for two weeks after stopping.
After reviewing data regarding various treatments for lower back pain, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality concluded that those suffering from back pain should first try conservative/natural treatments and then consider other options for lower back pain relief if pain persists. Oftentimes low back pain sufferers can find relief naturally by making changes to their lifestyles (including sleep, physical activity, stress and body weight) before choosing more intensive care options.
"I am a true believer in Biofreeze ($15; performancehealth.com). My football coach introduced me to it years ago. It's a topical cooling pain reliever that works very similarly to ice but since it's a gel, I can apply it before teaching classes and training clients to keep function in my muscles and joints. In addition to relieving muscle pain or soreness, it can be used to help arthritis and other muscular and joint discomforts too. " —Mat Forzaglia, The Fhitting Room instructor
Preliminary research suggests that hypnotherapy may be of some use in the treatment of low back pain. For instance, a pilot study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis found that a four-session hypnosis program (combined with a psychological education program) significantly reduced pain intensity and led to improvements in mood among patients with chronic low back pain.
“For years I have suffered with sciatica pain going down my right side. It is so painful that even sitting hurts. Nothing has ever worked well. I tried your patches by putting 3 discs on the painful area. For 3 days, I was pain free. As you suggested, I replaced the patches with new ones after 3 days and it no longer hurts. I also used it on my shoulder after a fall. It works! Thank you for helping me find relief.” – Norma M.
This essentially necessitates you to pick one balm, which is competent to treat a trivial throbbing at the ankle as well as work over an aspect as grave as Shin Splint. One articulate conversation with a M.D can authentically aid you to this end. Moreover, always strive to elect one such muscle rub salve that is nurtured with organic essential oils and moisturizing agents and renders a cooling sensation within an utmost short pace.
Although it is difficult to establish the mechanism of action of a plant due to the variety of its components, in vitro clinical trials have shown that the anti-inflammatory properties of arnica are based mainly on the inhibition of NF-kappa B transcription factor, which is a key part of the immunological and anti-inflammatory processes. This protein regulates the transcription of various inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukins, as well as that of the genes encoding COX-2 (an enzyme which favours inflammation).
As I write in this month’s Harvard Men’s Health Watch, these so-called topical analgesics work best for more superficial joints like the knees, ankles, feet, elbows, and hands. “In those areas, the medication can penetrate closer to the joint,” says Dr. Rosalyn Nguyen, a clinical instructor in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School.

A 2008 study published in the journal Spine found "strong evidence that acupuncture can be a useful supplement to other forms of conventional therapy" for low back pain. After analyzing 23 clinical trials with a total of 6,359 patients, the study authors also found "moderate evidence that acupuncture is more effective than no treatment" in relief of back pain.

I am 63 with osteoarthritis of my knee. I have struggled with pain relief and steroid injection hasn’t helped now waiting for new knee but need to control pain. I have just been recommended emu oil. I went to holland and Barrett and found Blue ease gel that has emu oil, capsicum and MSN amongst its ingredients. It does help the pain but skin burns (may have put too much on) how much will I need for a knee and will the burning sensation go away I have tried capsicum cream on prescription and that advised that burning sensation improves in a couple of weeks. From reading your advise re capsicum am I right in thinking that the burning sensation distracts the brain from the joint pain thanks
Hi Bob, Naproxen is an anti-inflammatory (NSAID) that is working from the inside, so ideally you want a cream or gel that works in a different way to gain opimum benefits (otherwise I would recommend Voltarol Pain Relief Gel which contains another NSAID called diclofenac). Movelat contains salicylic acid, which is a weaker NSAID than Naproxen so it may not provide much additional relief. I find Celadrin cream works well. Hope your pain improves soon. Best wishes, Sarah B
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Funny how things like this slip through the cracks. I communicate with patients and professionals locally and abroad more or less all day every day, study and research musculoskeletal pain problems obsessively, and am more or less constantly immersed in answering the question, “What can you do for body parts that hurt?” And yet I didn’t hear about this stuff for a good year after it had already hit the shelves.

In October 2007, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (Voltaren Gel) became the first topical NSAID for OA therapy approved in the United States following a long history of use internationally. Topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel delivers effective diclofenac concentrations in the affected joint with limited systemic exposure. Clinical trial data suggest that diclofenac sodium 1% gel provides clinically meaningful analgesia in OA patients with a low incidence of systemic AEs.
While there are mixed answers on how many servings of leafy greens one should eat each day for preventive effects, an overall eight to ten servings of vegetables and fruits daily is recommended for the best results. Of those, perhaps two to three servings of vegetables should be leafy greens. Leafy greens are rich in quercetin, a type of flavonoid that is responsible for broad anti-inflammatory benefits, as well as vitamin C, vitamin K, and essential minerals like magnesium. (15)

Whether due to a challenging session at the gym or normal wear and tear associated with aging, back pain shouldn’t impair your daily activities. Finding the best pain relief cream for back pain is easy with the array of back creams for pain available. You can deal with back stiffness and soreness quickly and with minimal fuss. Instead of over-the-counter pills, try these ointments for back pain.
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