Hi Brenda, The most effective painkilling gel is Voltarol which contains diclofenac, assuming your bad reaction to oral painkillers was not an allergy to NSAIDs. Another option to try is magnetic gloves, or a pain killing device such as Arc4Health, which can have quite miraculous painkilling effects. You should also ask your doctor to refer you to a pain clinic for specialist advice. I hope that helps. Best wishes, Sarah B

This cream acts as a natural pain reliever with every application on the body. With this particular cream, you are assured of getting relieved from the pain that you may experience on the joints and muscles, back pain, and arthritis pain. It would also assist you in effectively dealing with bruises by helping you deal with pain while reserving the gentle touch.

Hi iv just had my cast removed following my broken wrist where both bones were broken, im 58 and would like advice on which creams/gels i could safely use to help reduce the swelling in my fingers and hand and help reduce the muscle and tendon stiffness, im already doing exercises but the swelling stops me from being able to do much, im a self employed seamstress so maximising the use of my hand is essential, i cant use ice packs as i have Raynards syndrome, any advice would be very much appreciated, kindest regards
If you are the type of consumer who yearns for a natural muscle relaxer cream to help you solve the problem of experiencing sore muscles at different points in time more so after a tedious exercising activity then this is the type of cream to buy. With the cream, you would be able to deal with inflammation, chronic pain and sports injuries without much of a hustle.
White willow bark, for instance, may have pain-relieving properties similar to aspirin. Salicin, a compound found in white willow bark, is converted in the body to salicylic acid, just as aspirin is. Salicylic acid is believed to be the active compound that relieves pain and inflammation. Another herb sometimes used in the treatment of back pain is devil's claw. Devil's claw contains harpagosides, which are chemical compounds found to possess anti-inflammatory properties.
if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using diclofenac gel (Voltaren) or liquid (Pennsaid).plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to real or artificial sunlight (tanning beds or lamps, ultraviolet light) and to wear protective clothing to cover areas treated with diclofenac gel (Voltaren) or liquid (Pennsaid). Diclofenac may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.

I am in my mid 50’s and was recently diagnosed with arthritis in both my knees. My left knee was the absolute worse. Seems squats and lunges are the worst for arthritic knees and my worst pain followed these exercises. Since then I have gotten a personal trainer so that I won’t hurt myself trying to workout. Anyway, I am a 5k runner and I want to continue. But let me tell you guys about the topical regimen that I am using that I employed just short of going to get a cortisone injection. Magnesium Oil, MSM lotion and organic silica gel. I got all of these products from an on-line source of organic foods, products and such. I absolutely love their products and these 3 products have made my knee feel like I never was diagnosed with arthritis, and I’ve been following this morning and night application of the 3 products for a little over two weeks now. Let me tell you, I couldn’t sleep at night because of the pain. Now it’s the difference between night and day. I hope this helps someone


Hi Pauline, sorry to hear about your knee. Yes, capsaicin/capsicum cause stimulation of nerves endings so their chemicals are depleted and they reduce the level of pain messages they send on. The brain also naturally dismisses persistent signals. Some people do find it irritating, however, but better than the traditional treatments that mimic this action -bee stings and nettles! Best wishes, Sarah B
The usual dosage of standardized turmeric powder is 400–600 mg taken three times per day.[13] Side effects are few, but with extended use, this agent can cause stomach upset, and in extreme cases gastric ulcers may occur at very high doses. Caution should be used if the patient is taking anticoagulant medications or high doses of nonsteroidal drugs. Studies have shown that curcumin may be used in combination with lower doses of nonsteroidal medications.[7–9,11,21,40,87,111,121]
Many athletes and arthritis patients swear capsaicin creams reduce their pain and they love the deep warming sensation they provide. This heat may be associated with relaxation, which reduces their pain response. Researchers have concluded that capsaicin creams may reduce nerve and osteoarthritis pain in some patients (when compared to placebo), but they aren't very effective in reducing muscle pain.  Best results are achieved in joints that are close to the skin, like those in the hands or knee.
Direct from the Kalahari Desert comes devil’s claw, a claw-shaped fruit that has been used for centuries by the South African tribes as a natural remedy for inflammation and to treat arthritis pain. Numerous studies carried out on devil’s claw show it to have powerful natural NSAID-like properties. In fact, the journal Phytomedicine reported that it is just as effective as the osteoarthritis medication Diacerein. What’s more, studies carried out in both France and Germany pointed to devil claw’s effects being similar to cortisone.
Diclofenac sodium 1% gel (Voltaren, also available as a generic). When used for osteoarthritis pain of the hands, elbows or wrists, apply 2 grams to each affected area four times a day (a total of 8 grams per day). When used on knees, ankles, or feet, apply 4 grams to each affected area four times a day (a total of 16 grams per day).  However, the total amount used on your body should not exceed 32 grams per day. A dosing card comes with the gel so you can measure the correct amount.
Despite what a majority of people may have been made to believe concerning the issue of anti-inflammatory creams and the pain-relieving creams the truth is that the two types of creams differ immensely. Pain relief creams serve the important function of disrupting the transmission of pain signals from different parts of the body to the brain thus allowing you to feeling a sense of temporary pain relief. However, most cream pain relievers would not have elements that would help reduce inflammation or swelling. Nevertheless, the anti-inflammatory creams and the pain relief creams both can be used for arthritis flare-ups and dealing with minor sports injuries. Nevertheless, for those people who may have never used these types of medications before or those who may not be sure of the type to use it is important to consult with the doctor before using such a product. Most all, never use the anti-inflammatory creams on a child or expectant mother unless who check in with your doctor.
An essential nutrient available in certain foods (such as fortified milk and fish with small bones), vitamin D is produced naturally by the body during exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays. But since it's difficult to obtain your recommended daily intake of D solely through dietary sources and sun exposure, many medical experts recommend increasing your vitamin D levels by taking a dietary supplement.
Creams derived from natural products can also provide local relief for painful muscles in fibromyalgia. The best part is that topical treatments tend to be very well tolerated with few side effects. Arnica is an herb used since the 1500s to treat bruises, muscle pain, and inflammation. It is still used today as a natural treatment for muscle pain in many different topical remedies. One herbal homeopathic cream that I have found helpful is MyPainAway Fibro cream. It includes arnica to reduce muscle pain, echinacea to reduce inflammation, along with other herbs targeted to reduce nerve pain by improving microcirculation around pain-sensing nerves.
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Laugh more often. One study showed that social laughter actually increases pain tolerance.5 Laughing along with others was shown to have the highest positive impact. Laughter has many positive effects, including increasing circulation and oxygen, and raising your body's level of endorphins (the body's natural pain killers). There is a whole movement called "laughter yoga"—which helps people enjoy the many benefits of laughter without having to need a reason to laugh—it just focuses on laughing for its own sake.

Although it’s been available in Europe for many years, it was only approved for use in the United States in 2007. Also, other topical treatments (salicylates and capsaicin) have shown little potential in the past. And Arnica montana creams (Traumeel, for example) are extremely popular, but it’s unlikely that even full-strength arnica is medically potent, let alone when it is diluted down to traces.3


A 2008 study published in the journal Spine found "strong evidence that acupuncture can be a useful supplement to other forms of conventional therapy" for low back pain. After analyzing 23 clinical trials with a total of 6,359 patients, the study authors also found "moderate evidence that acupuncture is more effective than no treatment" in relief of back pain.
Feverfew. Feverfew has been used for centuries to treat headaches, stomachaches, and toothaches. Nowadays it's also used for migraines and rheumatoid arthritis. More studies are required to confirm whether feverfew is actually effective, but the herb may be worth trying since it hasn't been associated with serious side effects. Mild side effects include canker sores and irritation of the tongue and lips. Pregnant women should avoid this remedy.
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