People who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as topical diclofenac (Pennsaid, Voltaren) may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not use these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who use NSAIDs for a long time. Do not use an NSAID such as topical diclofenac if you have recently had a heart attack, unless directed to do so by your doctor.Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, or a stroke; if you smoke; and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of your body, or slurred speech.
Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with topical diclofenac 1% and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) to obtain the Medication Guide.
Ensure that the type of anti-inflammatory cream you buy for yourself, a friend, or family member is of the right quality and more efficient in helping you deal with your health predicaments. The best quality brands would be fast acting and gentle to your skin with every application. Most of all, the cream that you choose at any given point in time should not have any side effects otherwise you would be exposing yourself to the ordeal of tackling what would result from using the poor quality creams in hopes of dealing with a minor injury. The best cream would take the shortest period to help relieve you of any kind of pain or inflammation so that you would comfortably carry on with whatever you might be doing.

It contains arnica, a wonderful pain reliever used by many massage therapists, vitamin B6 that makes red blood cells that produces neurotransmitters, homocysteine levels, and also makes the hormones serotonin and norepinephrine; it has pyridoxine; choline bitartrate cetyl myristoleate; MSM (methylsulfonlmethane) that helps with scars, stretch marks, and pain; and has glucosamine, and boswellia serrata.
“I had sciatic pain so bad that I went to a doctor for a 'series of three shots' (or so he said) for the pain, yet ten shots later the pain was still there. When a friend of mine gave me a tube of Relief pain cream that had a little left in it so I could give it a try I was so amazed at how effective it was in relieving my pain that I immediately called and ordered two tubes, and I will be asking my doctor to stock it—because I absolutely love this stuff!" *
Topical anti-inflammatories work in the same way but, instead of having an effect on all of the body, they only work on the area to which you have applied them. When they are applied they are taken into (absorbed into) your skin. They then move deeper into areas of the body where there is inflammation (for example, your muscle). They relieve pain and reduce swelling affecting joints and muscles when rubbed into the skin over the affected area. Using a topical preparation means that the total amount of anti-inflammatory in your body is very low. This in turn means that you are much less likely to have a side-effect to this medicine.
My doctor reddened and paniced a bit when he took my B/P and blamed it on the tablets which I rarely took, but the gel had been increased due to a worsening scoliosis and and a damaged knee getting worse with age. Recent research states clearly that this is a serious side effect, and it was not just a small rise but one of 25-30 points on my normal B/P!!! It can also cause hardening of the arteries and eventually a heart attack.
For arthritis relief, it is important to have proteolytic activity on the systemic level. Known as protease, this category of enzymes acts as a catalyst in the breakdown of proteins into peptides or amino acids. This helps control both systemic inflammation and inflammation resulting from soft tissue injuries, like those associated with both rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Proteolytic enzymes also provide essential antioxidant and cardiovascular support. I will discuss two of the more potent ones here:
I have pain in booth knees from arthritis. I have used this cream for over a year. All the other pain relievers I have used, don't come close to Topricin for quick and long lasting pain relief. I use it every night and sleep like a baby. I would recommend this product to anyone that needs fast and lasting relief from pain. To me this is a God sent.
Many patients have told me they find celadrin cream effective for rapid relief of painful joints. It appears to work best when you apply it all around the joint – for example in a continuous band around the front, sides and back of a knee. One patient, who had two arthritic knees, told me he performed a personal experiment in which he applied celadrin cream around one knee but not the other. He was amazed at the difference in the treated knee which, within hours, became less painful and more mobile. Needless to say, he soon started applying it to both knees!
Can stomach problems cause lower back pain? The back is a sensitive part of the body, which has many nerves and organs nearby. This means that issues such as digestive conditions can occur at the same time as back pain. Back pain and bloating are common symptoms of injury, pregnancy, or gastrointestinal problems. Treatment depends on the cause. Learn more here. Read now
This information is not designed to replace a physician's independent judgment about the appropriateness or risks of a procedure for a given patient. Always consult your doctor about your medical conditions or back problem. SpineUniverse does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use of the SpineUniverse.com site is conditional upon your acceptance of our User Agreement
Capsaicin cream, also called capsicum cream, is available in drug stores, health food stores, and online. A typical dosage is 0.025% capsaicin cream applied four times a day. The most common side effect is a stinging or burning sensation in the area. If possible, wear disposable gloves (available at drugstores) before applying the cream. Be careful not to touch the eye area or open skin. A tube or jar of capsaicin cream typically costs between $8 and $25.

Despite what a majority of people may have been made to believe concerning the issue of anti-inflammatory creams and the pain-relieving creams the truth is that the two types of creams differ immensely. Pain relief creams serve the important function of disrupting the transmission of pain signals from different parts of the body to the brain thus allowing you to feeling a sense of temporary pain relief. However, most cream pain relievers would not have elements that would help reduce inflammation or swelling. Nevertheless, the anti-inflammatory creams and the pain relief creams both can be used for arthritis flare-ups and dealing with minor sports injuries. Nevertheless, for those people who may have never used these types of medications before or those who may not be sure of the type to use it is important to consult with the doctor before using such a product. Most all, never use the anti-inflammatory creams on a child or expectant mother unless who check in with your doctor.
I use my Rogue Fitness Supernova ($40; roguefitness.com) for self-myofascial release (SMR). By applying pressure directly to sore muscles with my supernova, I am able to roll out knots (or adhesions) on the muscle. This allows the body to bring blood flow to troubled areas by transporting nutrients and oxygen to the muscles for faster repair." — Troy Brooks, YG Studios and founder TB Elite Fitness
“I was first introduced to Relief by my Chiropractor after I pulled a muscle. Later my son, while playing hockey, received a very nasty hit during a game and was given Biofreeze as part of his recovery process. I can tell you Relief is 10x better—he was still in pain after using the Biofreeze, so I grabbed the Relief and he could not believe the difference. Now we are a Relief ONLY household. I am spreading the word to all the other hockey mom’s on the quality of your product and how well it works. Thank you for creating Relief and keep up the good work.” *
Water, Menthol, MSM, Glycerin, Dipropylene Glycol, Celadrin, Camphor, Cetearyl Alcohol / Cetearyl Glucoside, Beeswax, Microcrystaline Wax, Butylglycerin, Kyounin Yu, Macadamia, Integrifolia Seed Oil, Glyceryl Stearate / PEG-100 Stearate, Dimethicone, Hyaluronic Acid, Portulaca Oleracea Extract, Allantoin, Licorice Root Extract, Arginine, Carbomer, Lavender Oil, Peppermint Oil, Disodium EDTA, Polyacrylate-13/Polyisobutene / Plysorbate 20
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS) machines are small, battery-powered devices that transmit low-voltage electrical currents through electrodes that are attached to your skin. Considered very safe, TENS machines, according to one theory, work by scrambling the message of pain to the brain — literally blocking it. Another theory suggests that the electrical impulses cause a release of endorphins that override the sensation of pain. Many back pain patients have had success with TENS machines, though their effectiveness has not been clearly proven in controlled studies. Ask your doctor or physical therapist if this therapy might be right for you.
“Relief pain cream is my favorite vs. Icy Hot and Bengay, both of which I've never really liked due to their smell and their burning my skin. This stuff soothes & heals like no other! Relief has a pleasant and relaxing scent (including, but not limited to, lavender and menthol) and it doesn't hurt at all. I use it for muscle aches and headaches, allergies, colds (around temples, chest, neck, ears) AND on sunburns. Yep, this stuff is better than anything else I've tried on sunburns! I also use it occasionally for foot pain after being on my feet all day. I use essential oils, and I could probably blend my own version of this, but this blend is so perfect that I don't even want to try” *
tell your doctor if you have severe diarrhea or vomiting or think you may be dehydrated; if you drink or have a history of drinking large amounts of alcohol, and if you have or have ever had any of the conditions mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section or asthma, especially if you have frequent stuffed or runny nose or nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose); swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; heart failure; or kidney or liver disease.
To minimize your risks for a skin reaction, Cowling recommends doing a skin test before starting any topical pain reliever and washing your hands immediately after applying. Also don’t use topicals on any areas of the body where you have an open wound or broken skin, even a scratch. If you develop severe itching, redness, swelling or any other signs of a worsening skin reaction, contact your doctor. 
Not as popular as many other essential oils, arnica oil belongs in every medicine cabinet. Considered generally safe for topical use, arnica oil used on the skin helps ease inflammatory pain associated with insect bites, bruises and even arthritis flare-ups. (5, 6) To treat bruises, applying arnica oil twice daily (as long as the skin is not broken) helps reduce bruising inflammation even better than low-concentration vitamin K formulations. (3)
Turmeric roots are dried and ground into a spicy orange powder that has been used as an anti-inflammatory and pain reliever for hundreds of years in India. More recently researchers have called curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, the “herbal ibuprofen.” One study found that curcumin was actually more effective at reducing pain and swelling in arthritic joints than anti-inflammatory medications.
The first is that inflammation-lowering NSAIDs destroy your gut lining. Check the bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin in your medicine cabinet. You’ll see it right on the label: “NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach and/or intestine.”[1] Long-term low-dose aspirin use is particularly likely to cause ulcers and tear holes in your intestine.[2]
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